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Neighborhood factors may predict heart failure

Tue, 01/09/2018 - 04:32
Study Highlights:

  • Neighborhood-level socioeconomic factors may significantly predict heart failure risk beyond individual cardiovascular risk factors, individual income and education level.
  • Researchers found that almost 5 percent of the increased heart failure risk in “deprived” areas was attributable to neighborhood factors.
  • Improvements in community resources such as exercise facilities, healthy food outlets and medical facilities could benefit residents. 

Embargoed until 4 a.m. CT / 5 a.m. ET Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018

DALLAS, Jan. 9, 2018 – Neighborhood-level socioeconomic factors in low-income areas may significantly predict heart failure risk beyond individual health factors and socioeconomic status, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

The study compared census tract data on socioeconomic deprivation – a clustering of neighborhood-level variables of wealth, education, occupation and housing patterns – and heart failure rates among 27,078 middle-aged whites and African-Americans from the Southeastern states.

Researchers grouped the participants (average age 55, 69 percent African-American, 63 percent women) in three groups ranging from the least-deprived to the most-deprived neighborhoods. During an average follow-up of more than five years, 4,300 participants were diagnosed with heart failure.

Researchers noted that residents living in more socioeconomically deprived areas were at the highest risk for heart failure. As neighborhood socioeconomic factors worsened between one group to the next, researchers noted a 12 percent increase in risk of heart failure. After adjusting for other factors, researchers say 4.8 percent of the variance in heart-failure risk was explained by neighborhood factors.

“There is existing evidence suggesting strong, independent associations between personal socioeconomic status – like education, income level and occupation – and risks of heart failure and many other chronic diseases,” said Loren Lipworth, Sc.D., the study’s co-senior author and associate professor of epidemiology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee.

“But what this study adds is evidence suggesting that characteristics of your place of residence, actually also play a significant role in influencing the risk of heart failure over and above the role of your own individual socioeconomic characteristics,” she said. “It opens the door for possible interventions that center on preventive measures in the community.”

Study participants were from the Southern Community Cohort Study (SCCS) – an ongoing prospective investigation of cancer and other chronic conditions in a largely resource-limited, underinsured group of recruits in 12 Southeastern states.

Heart failure is a major public health problem, particularly in the southeastern United States, which has the highest prevalence of established heart-failure risk factors, including coronary heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity.

More than 50 percent of the participants studied lived in the most deprived neighborhoods. Seventy percent of residents studied earned less than $15,000 a year. Nearly 39 percent had less than a high-school education and 44 percent were obese.

Researchers suggest residents may benefit most from improvements in community resources such as exercise facilities, healthy food outlets and medical facilities. 

“Increased and improved access to community-level resources could mitigate cardiovascular disease risk factors like obesity, hypertension and diabetes,” said Elvis Akwo, M.D., Ph.D., first author of the study and a postdoctoral research fellow at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. “Improved community-level resources may ultimately reduce the risk of heart failure in these communities.”

The American Heart Association and other organizations recognize that improvements in cardiovascular health requires strategies that target the entire spectrum of health and wellness, including public policy changes, prevention efforts and treatment. The focus on public policy and prevention may have the greatest potential to mitigate the burden of cardiovascular disease and improve overall health, researchers said.

An accompanying editorial by Wayne Rosamond Ph.D.; M.S. and Anna Johnson, Ph.D.; MSPH, said this research adds an important aspect to our understanding of the role of neighborhood in health by focusing on low-income neighborhoods.

“By conducting this study in a predominantly low socioeconomic status (SES) population, the potential for bias from individual SES is reduced, allowing for a direct interpretation of associations of neighborhood aspects with heart failure incidence,” Rosasmond and Johnson wrote.  

“The careful and unique population prospective cohort approach taken by Akwo and colleagues further establishes that there indeed is something unique about neighborhoods.”

However, the study’s focus primarily on low-income, middle-aged adults limits it from being generalized to other groups. But researchers believe the emphasis on this population – now and in the future – provides much-needed research attention on a segment of people who have been underrepresented in previous cardiovascular studies.

Co-authors are Edmond Kabagambe, D.V.M., Ph.D.; Frank Harrell, Ph.D.; William Blot, Ph.D.; Justin Bachmann, M.D., M.P.H.; Thomas Wang, M.D.; and Deepak Gupta, M.D. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

The National Cancer Institute and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funded the study.

Additional Resources:

###

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: 214-706-1173

Bridgette McNeill: 214-706-1135; bridgette.mcneil@heart.org  

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

]]>Heart NewsTue, 09 Jan 2018 10:00:05 GMTNeighborhood-level socioeconomic factors may significantly predict heart failure risk beyond individual cardiovascular risk factors, individual income and education level. Researchers found that almost 5 percent of the increased heart failure risk in “deprived” areas was attributable to neighborhood factors. Improvements in community resources such as exercise facilities, healthy food outlets and medical facilities could benefit residents. https://newsroom.heart.org/news/neighborhood-factors-may-predict-heart-failureTue, 09 Jan 2018 10:00:00 GMT

Multi-gene test predicts early heart disease risk

Mon, 01/08/2018 - 10:26
Study Highlights:

  • A risk score based on multiple genetic differences, or polygenic test, predicted significantly more cases of early heart disease than standard tests for single genetic defects.
  • The polygenic test predicted a high risk for early-onset heart disease in 1 out of 53 individuals, compared to 1 in 256 for the most frequent single genetic defect.

Embargoed until 4 a.m. CT / 5 a.m. ET Monday, Jan. 8, 2018

DALLAS, Jan. 8, 2018 — A risk score based on multiple genetic differences, or polygenic risk score, predicted significantly more cases of early-onset heart disease than standard tests for single genetic defects, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine.

“Our results provide convincing evidence that the polygenic risk score could be added to the genetic investigation of patients with very early coronary artery disease,” said study lead author

Sébastien Thériault M.D., M.Sc., FRCPc, assistant professor at Laval University in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, and researcher at the Quebec Heart and Lung Institute.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death, both in the United States and worldwide. The most common form is coronary artery disease, which occurs when the blood vessels to the heart narrow or harden. Most people can decrease their risk by not smoking, being physically active, maintaining a healthy diet and body weight, and controlling cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar.

In rare instances, however, high blood levels of the so-called bad cholesterol, LDL, result from a genetic defect called familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Patients with this genetic defect are at increased risk for early-onset heart disease, defined in the study as before age 40 in men and age 45 in women, so early diagnosis and treatment are critical. The problem is that many patients with early-onset heart disease do not have this single genetic defect which can be measured by current tests.

Accordingly, this study looked at the relationship between a risk score based on multiple genetic differences and early-onset heart disease. Results showed that the polygenic risk score predicted a high risk for early-onset heart disease in 1 out of 53 individuals at the same level as FH does. The prevalence of FH is 1 in 256 individuals for the single genetic test for FH.

“The increase in genetic risk was independent of other known risk factors, suggesting that testing for multiple genetic differences is clinically useful to evaluate risk and guide management,” said senior author Guillaume Paré, M.D. M.Sc. FRCPc, associate professor of medicine at McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and director of the Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Laboratory. “Combining polygenic screening with current testing for familial hypercholesterolemia could potentially increase five-fold the number of cases for which a genetic explanation can be found.”

The investigators developed the polygenic risk score based on 182 genetic differences related to coronary artery disease. They then compared polygenic risk scores between study participants with and without early-onset heart disease.

Study participants included 30 patients with early-onset heart disease seen in the investigators’ clinic from 2014 to 2016. None of the patients in this study with high polygenic risk scores had the single, rare genetic defect for FH. Ninety-six patients with early-onset heart disease enrolled in the UK Biobank study between 2006 and 2010 were also tested. As controls, the study also included 111,283 UK Biobank participants without early-onset heart disease. Forty-seven percent of the UK Biobank participants were male and their average age was 58 years. The UK Biobank is a large study in the United Kingdom looking at the relationship between genetics, the environment and disease.

All study participants were of European descent, so the results may not apply to other populations. Another limitation is its inclusion of patients with severe early-onset heart disease, which is more likely to have genetic causes than milder disease.

Other co-authors are: Ricky Lali B.Sc.; Michael Chong M.Sc.; James L. Velianou M.D.; and Madhu K. Natarajan, M.D., M.Sc. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research and Université Laval; a Canada Research Chair in Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology; and the CISCO Professorship in Integrated Health Biosystems funded the study.

Additional Resources:

  • After Jan. 8, view the manuscript online.
  • Follow AHA/ASA news on Twitter @HeartNews
  • For updates and new science from the Circulation journal follow @CircAHA

###

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: 214-706-1173

Carrie Thacker: 214-706-1665; carrie.thacker@heart.org

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721); heart.org and strokeassociation.org

]]>Heart NewsMon, 08 Jan 2018 15:53:34 GMTStudy Highlights: A risk score based on multiple genetic differences, or polygenic test, predicted significantly more cases of early heart disease than standard tests for single genetic defects. The polygenic test predicted a high risk for early-onset heart disease in 1 out of 53 individuals, compared to 1 in 256 for the most frequent single genetic defect. https://newsroom.heart.org/news/multi-gene-test-predicts-early-heart-disease-riskMon, 08 Jan 2018 10:00:00 GMT

Middle-aged couch potatoes may reverse heart effects of a sedentary life with exercise training

Mon, 01/08/2018 - 10:26
Study Highlights:

  • Two years of exercise training during middle age may reduce or reverse the cardiac consequences of a sedentary lifestyle.
  • Two years of exercise training may be an effective lifestyle modification for rejuvenating aging hearts and reducing the risk of heart failure.

Embargoed until 4 a.m. CT / 5 a.m. ET Monday, Jan. 8, 2018

DALLAS, Jan. 8, 2018 — Middle-aged couch potatoes may reduce or reverse the risk of heart failure associated with years of sitting if they participate in two years of regular aerobic exercise training, according to a new study in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Study participants who adhered to the aerobic exercise regimen had significant improvements in how their body used oxygen and had decreased cardiac stiffness after two years, both markers of a healthier heart. Aerobic exercises are sustained activities, such as walking, swimming, running and others that strengthen the heart and other muscles and help the body use oxygen effectively.

“The key to a healthier heart in middle age is the right dose of exercise, at the right time in life,” said study author Benjamin D. Levine, M.D., lead author of the study and the founder and director of the Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine, a joint program between Texas Health Resources and UT Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, Texas.

“We found what we believe to be the optimal dose of the right kind of exercise, which is four to five times a week, and the ‘sweet spot’ in time, when the heart risk from a lifetime of sedentary behavior can be improved -- which is late-middle age. The result was a reversal of decades of a sedentary lifestyle on the heart for most of the study participants,” he said.

The researchers analyzed the hearts of 53 adults ages 45-64 who were healthy but sedentary at the start of the study – meaning they tended to sit most of the time. Study participants received either two years of training, including high- and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise four or more days a week (exercise group), or they were assigned to a control group, which engaged in regular yoga, balance training and weight training three times a week for two years.

The exercise group committed to a progressive exercise program which monitored participants’ recorded heart rates. People in this group worked up to doing exercises, such as four-by-fours –4 sets of four minutes of exercise at 95 percent of their maximum heart rate, followed by three minutes of active recovery at 60 percent to 75 percent peak heart rate. In this study, maximum heart rate was defined as the hardest a person could exercise and still complete the four-minute interval. Active recovery heart rate is the speed at which the heart beats after exercise. 

They found:

  • Overall, the committed exercise intervention made people fitter, increasing VO2max, the maximum amount of energy used during exercise, by 18 percent. There was no improvement in oxygen uptake in the control group.
  • The committed exercise program also notably decreased cardiac stiffness. There was no change in cardiac stiffness among the controls.

Sedentary behaviors – such as sitting or reclining for long periods of time – increase the risk of the heart muscle shrinking and stiffening in late-middle age and increases heart failure risk. Previous studies have shown that elite athletes, who spent a lifetime doing high-intensity exercise, had significantly fewer effects of aging on the heart and blood vessels, according to Levine.

However, the six to seven days a week of intense exercise training that many elite athletes perform throughout their life isn’t a reality for many middle-aged adults, which led Levine and colleagues to study different exercise doses, including casual exercise at two to three days a week and “committed exercise” at four to five days a week.

“We found that exercising only two or three times a week didn’t do much to protect the heart against aging. But committed exercise four to five times a week was almost as effective at preventing sedentary heart aging as the more extreme exercise of elite athletes,” he said. “We’ve also found that the ‘sweet spot’ in life to get off the couch and start exercising is in late-middle age, when the heart still has plasticity.”

People need to make an exercise program part of their personal routine, just like they brush their teeth every day, according to Levine. “I recommend that people do four to five days a week of committed exercise as part of their goals in preserving their health,” he said.

The program, according to Levine, should be similar to the one studied, including at least one long session a week, (such as an hour of tennis, cycling, running, dancing, brisk walking, etc.); one high-intensity aerobic session, such as the four-by-four interval training described previously; two or three days a week of moderate intensity exercise, where exercisers break a sweat but can still carry on a conversation; and at least one weekly strength training session.

“That’s my prescription for life, and this study really reinforces that it has quite extraordinary effects on the structure and function of the heart and blood vessels,” he said.

One of the study’s limitations is the researchers selected volunteers who were willing and able to participate in an intensive exercise regimen, so results might not apply to the general adult population. Another potential limitation is that study participants were for the most part Caucasian, which questions whether these results would apply to other racial groups.

Co-authors are Erin Howden, Ph.D.; Sarma Satyam, M.D.; Justin Lawley, Ph.D.; William Cornwell, M.D.; Douglas Stoller, M.D.; Marcus Urey, M.D.; and Beverley Adams-Huet, M.S. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

The National Institutes of Health funded the study.

Additional Resources:

###

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: 214-706-1173

Darcy Spitz; (212) 878-5940; darcy.spitz@heart.org

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

]]>Heart NewsMon, 08 Jan 2018 15:53:10 GMTStudy Highlights: Two years of exercise training during middle age may reduce or reverse the cardiac consequences of a sedentary lifestyle. Two years of exercise training may be an effective lifestyle modification for rejuvenating aging hearts and reducing the risk of heart failure. https://newsroom.heart.org/news/middle-aged-couch-potatoes-may-reverse-heart-effects-of-a-sedentary-life-with-exercise-trainingMon, 08 Jan 2018 10:00:00 GMT

Mental stress-induced constricted blood vessels more likely in women

Thu, 12/21/2017 - 04:18
Study Highlight:

  • In women with heart disease, constriction of peripheral vessels during mental stress affects the heart circulation more than men’s, potentially raising women’s risk of heart-related events and death.

Embargoed until 4 a.m. CT / 5 a.m. ET, Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017

DALLAS, Dec. 21, 2017 – In women with heart disease, constriction of peripheral vessels during mental stress affects the heart circulation more than men’s, potentially raising women’s risk of heart-related events and death, according to new research in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, an American Heart Association journal.

In most people, mental stress causes peripheral vessels to constrict. In people with heart disease, this effect can cause a reduction in blood supply to the heart muscle called “ischemia.”

“This research is important because previous studies have shown that a reduction in blood supply to the heart (ischemia) during mental stress doubles the risk of heart attack or death from heart disease,” said Viola Vaccarino, M.D., Ph.D., senior author of the study and professor of epidemiology and medicine at Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health in Atlanta, Georgia. “This increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events is about the same level as that seen in people who develop reduced blood flow in the heart muscle during a conventional test, such as a treadmill stress test.” 

In the Mental Stress Ischemia Mechanisms Prognosis study, 678 adults (average age 63) with heart disease delivered a speech while researchers measured their blood pressure and heart rate, took imaging pictures of their hearts and measured the constriction of tiny arteries supplying blood in their fingers.

Previously, researchers found that stress-induced reduced blood supply to the heart happened more often in women under age 50 than in men and older women. In this new analysis from the same study, the researchers found:

  • Reduced blood supply to the heart during mental stress in women was mostly influenced by the constriction of tiny peripheral blood vessels in reaction to mental stress, which can cause an increase in afterload, the force the heart must exert to pump blood out of the heart.

  • Reduced blood supply to the heart during mental stress in men was mostly due to a rise in blood pressure and heart rate during mental stress, which increased the workload on the heart.

“Our findings in the peripheral circulation also could reflect what occurs in the arteries in the heart. Instead of dilating and increasing blood flow to the heart during stress, in women the tiny blood vessels are constricted, leading to areas of reduced blood flow,” said Vaccarino, who is also chair of the department of epidemiology at the Emory University School of Public Health. “Constriction of peripheral vessels can also induce ischemia in the heart indirectly, because the heart has to pump against increased resistance.”

For people with heart disease, these results emphasize the importance of finding ways to reduce psychological stress and its potential impact on the body, researchers said.

“Women with heart disease need to know that they may be vulnerable to the effects of mental stress and think about ways to protect their hearts, such as relaxation techniques and physical exercise,” Vaccarino said.

Health professionals treating people with heart disease need to pay attention to the burden of mental stress on their patients, particularly women.

“The psychosocial sphere doesn’t receive a lot of attention during current clinical practice, but it is very important to advise both women and men with heart disease about interventions to reduce stress, and to refer them to other professionals if they need help with depression or anxiety,” Vaccarino said.

Gender differences in the impact of stress on the cardiovascular system detected in this study emphasize the importance of including enough women in all studies of heart disease so that their results can be analyzed separately.

However, this study could not tell whether the unhealthy reaction to mental stress in these participants eventually translated into greater numbers of heart attacks or other indicators of worsening heart disease. This is the objective of the team’s future research.

Co-authors are Samaah Sullivan, Ph.D.; Muhammad Hammadah, M.D.; Ibhar Al Mheid, M.D.; Kobina Wilmot, M.D.; Ronnie Ramadan, M.D.; Ayman Alkhoder, M.D.; Nino Isakadze, M.D., Amit Shah, M.D.; Oleksiy Levantsevych, M.D.; Pratik M. Pimple, M.B.B.S., M.P.H.; Michael Kutner, Ph.D.; Laura Ward, M.P.H.; Ernest V. Garcia, Ph.D.; Jonathon Nye, Ph.D.; Puja K. Mehta, M.D.; Tené T. Lewis, Ph.D.; J. Douglas Bremner, M.D.; Paolo Raggi, M.D.; and Arshed A. Quyyumi, M.D. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute funded the study.

Additional Resources:

###

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: 214-706-1173

Karen Astle: 214-706-1392; karen.astle@heart.org

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Heart NewsThu, 21 Dec 2017 10:00:05 GMTStudy Highlight: In women with heart disease, constriction of peripheral vessels during mental stress affects the heart circulation more than men’s, potentially raising women’s risk of heart-related events and death. https://newsroom.heart.org/news/mental-stress-induced-constricted-blood-vessels-more-likely-in-womenThu, 21 Dec 2017 10:00:00 GMT

Unmarried heart patients face higher risk of death

Wed, 12/20/2017 - 04:59
Study Highlights:

  • Compared to married heart disease patients, being unmarried was associated with a higher risk of dying.
  • This is the first study to show an association between marital status and death from any cause and heart disease-related death in a high-risk heart patient population.

Embargoed until 4 a.m. CT / 5 a.m. ET,  Wednesday, Dec. 20, 2017

DALLAS, Dec. 20, 2017 — Compared to married heart disease patients, being unmarried was associated with a higher risk of dying, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Scientists have known that divorced individuals are at increased risk for death in general. However, few studies have evaluated the relationship between adverse cardiovascular outcomes and marital status in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease.

The study of 6,051 patients (average age 63, 23 percent black) undergoing cardiac catheterization for coronary artery disease, is the first to show poor outcomes specifically among those who were divorced, separated, widowed or never married.

Patients were followed for 3.7 years. Researchers found that compared to married patients, being unmarried was associated with:

  • 24 percent higher risk of death from any cause;
  • 45 percent higher risk of death from cardiovascular disease; and
  • 52 percent higher risk of cardiovascular death/heart attack.

And specifically, the risk of cardiovascular death/heart attack was:

  • 40 percent higher for those who were never married;
  • 41 percent higher for those who were divorced or separated; and
  • 71 percent higher for those who had been widowed.

1,085 deaths were reported in this study (including 688 cardiovascular deaths and 272 heart attacks) during the follow-up.

“I was somewhat surprised by the magnitude of the influence of being married has (on heart patients),” said Arshed Quyyumi, M.D., lead researcher  and co-director of Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute and professor of medicine at Emory University in Atlanta. “Social support provided by marriage, and perhaps many other benefits of companionship, are important for people with heart disease.”

Unmarried individuals were more likely to be female and black, have hypertension, heart failure, or high cholesterol and less likely to be smokers compared with the married patients.

Researchers suggest that it may be important to consider marital status in treating coronary artery disease patients. Psychological conditions associated with being unmarried and potentially more aggressive follow-up and therapy needs to be considered in future studies.

Patients with severe heart valve damage, anemia, congenital heart disease, cancer or active inflammatory disease were excluded from this study. Marital status was determined from self-administered questionnaires. Divorced and separated people were combined into one group for this study. Telephone interviews and medical chart abstractions were used to identify adverse outcomes.

Researchers suggest the study be interpreted with caution as it is a retrospective analysis conducted at a single institution and did not follow-up regarding continued marital status. The findings cannot be applied to the general population without cardiovascular disease. In addition, the study did not consider cohabitation.

Co-authors are William M. Schultz, M.D.; Salim S. Hayek, M.D.; Ayman Samman Tahhan, M.D.; Yi-An Ko, Ph.D.; Pratik Sandesara, M.D.; Mosaab Awad, M.D.; Kareem H. Mohammed, M.D.; Keyur Patel M.D.; Michael Yuan, MPH; Shuai Zheng, Ph.D.; Matthew L. Topel, M.D.; Joy Hartsfield; Ravila MBhimani; Tina Varghese, M.D.; Jonathan H. Kim, M.D.; Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.; Peter Wilson, M.D. and Viola Vaccarino M.D., Ph.D. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

National Institutes of Health grants and the Abraham J. & Phyllis Katz Foundation (Atlanta, GA) helped fund the study.

Additional Resources:

###

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: 214-706-1173

Karen Astle: 214-706-1392; karen.astle@heart.org

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Heart NewsWed, 20 Dec 2017 10:00:04 GMTStudy Highlights: Compared to married heart disease patients, being unmarried was associated with a higher risk of dying. This is the first study to show an association between marital status and death from any cause and heart disease-related death in a high-risk heart patient population. https://newsroom.heart.org/news/unmarried-heart-patients-face-higher-risk-of-deathWed, 20 Dec 2017 10:00:00 GMT

Higher risk of dying due to heart cell damage without any symptoms occurs during or after non-heart surgery

Mon, 12/04/2017 - 04:48
Study Highlights:

  • One in seven patients 65 or older undergoing non-heart surgery experienced heart cell damage during or after surgery, known as perioperative myocardial injury (PMI).
  • Deaths of patients with PMI were six times higher in the 30 days following surgery compared to patients without PMI.

Embargoed until 4 a.m. CT / 5 a.m. ET Monday, December 4, 2017

DALLAS, December 4, 2017 — Surgery that doesn’t involve the heart may cause damage to the heart in people with known or at high risk of developing heart disease and was  associated with an increased risk of death, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation. 

Heart cell damage during or after non-heart surgery, known as perioperative myocardial injury (PMI), is an important yet often undetected complication following non-heart surgery and is strongly associated with death within 30 days after surgery, according to research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation. The causes of PMI are still under investigation. 

“Patients with PMI are easily missed because they show no symptoms of heart disease in the majority of cases and only very rarely experience chest pain, which is the typical symptom of heart attack,” said Christian Puelacher, M.D., Ph.D., first author of the study and a clinical researcher at Cardiovascular Research Institute Basel, in Basel, Switzerland.

To determine whether a patient’s non-heart surgery damaged heart cells, researchers screened patients for PMI by measuring levels of troponin – a heart protein -- in the blood before and after surgery to determine if there was injury to the heart. Troponin can indicate damage to the heart even when the patient has no symptoms. Non-heart surgeries ranged from low-risk (prostate or knee surgery) to moderate risk (hip replacement or gall bladder removal) to high risk (peripheral artery bypass or resection of a lung or the liver).

The researchers found that 1 out of 7 patients above the age of 65 or with preexisting coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, or stroke developed PMI. More than 90 percent of PMI patients reported typical chest pain. Patients with PMI had six times more likely to die of any cause within 30 days compared to patients without PMI. The high death rate associated with PMI persisted up to one year after surgery.

The increased death rate within the first 30 days of surgery highlights that PMI is associated with death early after surgery, Puelacher said. After one year, it was clear that the patients who had high levels of troponin, meaning there was some damage to the heart from non-heart surgery, were more likely to die, and that the main increase in deaths was observed within the first weeks after surgery.

“Recognizing PMI as a potential contributor to death after surgery might help improve the outcomes of non-cardiac surgery,” Puelacher said. “However, since there are no clear treatment recommendations for these patients, treatment currently has to be tailored to each patient individually. Therefore, further research is needed to find optimal PMI management strategies following detection.”

Patients were enrolled in the BASEL-PMI study, which is aimed at improving patient outcomes after non-cardiac surgery, focusing on heart complications in the period after surgery. From 2014 to 2015, 2,018 patients with known or at high risk of developing heart disease undergoing 2,546 non-cardiac surgeries at the University Hospital Basel in Switzerland, were included in the study.

Co-authors are Giovanna Lurati Buse, M.D., Daniela Seeberger, M.D., Lorraine Sazgary, M.D., Stella Marbot, M.D., Andreas Lampart, M.D., Jaqueline Espinola, M.D., Christoph Kindler, M.D., Angelika Hammerer, M.D., Esther Seeberger, D.A.S., Ivo Strebel, M.Sc., Karin Wildi, M.D., Raphael Twerenbold, M.D., Jeanne du Fay de Lavallaz, M.D., Luzius Steiner, M.D., Ph.D., Lorenz Gurke, M.D., Tobias Breidthardt, M.D., Katharina Rentsch, D.Sc., Andreas Buser, M.D., Danielle M Gualandro, Ph.D., Stefan Osswald, M.D., and Christian Mueller, M.D., for the BASEL-PMI investigators.

Contributing authors are:  Manfred Seeberger, M.D., Mirjam Christ-Crain, M.D., Ph.D., Florim Cuculi, M.D., Patrick Badertscher, M.D., Thomas Nestelberger, M.D., Desiree Wussler, M.D., Dayana Flores, M.D., Jasper Boeddinghaus, M.D., Zaid Sabti, M.D., Maria Rubini Giménez, M.D., Nikola Kozhuharov, M.D., Samyut Shrestha, M.D., Wanda Kloos, M.D., Jens Lohrmann, M.D., Tobias Reichlin, M.D., Michael Freese, R.N., Kathrin Meissner, R.N., Christoph Kaiser, M.D., and Andreas Buser, M.D.

Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

The University of Basel, the University Hospital Basel, the Swiss Heart Foundation, Abbott, Astra Zeneca, the Ph.D. Educational Platform for Health Sciences, the Forschungsfond Kantonsspital Aarau, and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation Basel funded the study.

Additional Resources:

###

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: 214-706-1173

Staff Contact; Darcy Spitz; (212) 878-5940; darcy.spitz@heart.org

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

]]>Heart NewsMon, 04 Dec 2017 10:00:04 GMTStudy Highlights: One in seven patients 65 or older undergoing non-heart surgery experienced heart cell damage during or after surgery, known as perioperative myocardial injury (PMI). Deaths of patients with PMI were six times higher in the 30 days following surgery compared to patients without PMI. https://newsroom.heart.org/news/higher-risk-of-dying-due-to-heart-cell-damage-without-any-symptoms-occurs-during-or-after-non-heart-surgeryMon, 04 Dec 2017 10:00:00 GMT

Using Real Patient Stories, New PSA Campaign Urges Americans to Bring High Blood Pressure Under Control

Thu, 11/16/2017 - 06:13
New York, NY, November 16, 2017: Today the American Heart Association (AHA), American Stroke Association (ASA), and the American Medical Association (AMA) announced a new public service awareness (PSA) campaign in partnership with the Ad Council. The campaign seeks to raise awareness of the serious, life-altering consequences of uncontrolled high blood pressure, and motivate people to work with their doctor on developing and committing to a treatment plan to manage their blood pressure. Launched on the heels of a new guideline that means more people will have high blood pressure, the new campaign features actual stroke and heart attack survivors to show viewers the devastating consequences of uncontrolled high blood pressure—underscoring the urgency of controlling the condition.

An estimated 103 million American adults now have high blood pressure, but only about half have their condition under control. While most people know what their blood pressure numbers are, many don’t feel an urgency to manage them because there are often no signs or symptoms associated with high blood pressure—which is why it’s often referred to as the “silent killer.” If left untreated, high blood pressure can lead to potentially fatal consequences like heart attack and stroke. Although there is no cure for high blood pressure, it can be managed effectively by working with a doctor to create a treatment plan, which includes healthy lifestyle changes such as eating a healthy diet, exercising, consuming less salt, drinking alcohol in moderation, losing weight if overweight, and taking medication if needed.

Based on the latest available science, the 2017 Guideline for the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults now considers a person to have hypertension when they have persistently elevated blood pressures at or above 130 systolic or 80 diastolic. While this now means that nearly half of all American adults have high blood pressure, treatment still begins with lifestyle changes. Both the new guideline and PSA campaign encourage people to adopt healthy behaviors and prevent problems by gaining awareness of their blood pressure and taking earlier action to control it.

“Of all the things we can do right now to reduce heart disease, strokes, and other debilitating disease, controlling blood pressure is one thing that has tremendous potential to save lives and improve well-being,” said Eduardo Sanchez, M.D., M.P.H., FAAFP, who is the American Heart Association’s Chief Medical Officer for Prevention. “Physicians and patients, together, need a clear and workable plan to keep blood pressure controlled. We want to help make that happen.”

The new “HBP Numbers” campaign links blood pressure numbers to the real effects of high blood pressure by helping viewers visualize the consequences from people who have suffered a heart attack or stroke. The PSAs, developed pro bono by Havas Adrenaline and filmed by renowned photographer and director Marco Grob, provide a hopeful and empowering message that anyone with high blood pressure can lower their risk of heart attack or stroke by talking to their doctor and finding a treatment plan that works for them.

“The real-life patients featured in this campaign have experienced first-hand the devastating and lasting effects of not having their high blood pressure under control. They are bravely sharing their stories and letting people see the real, negative health consequences of high blood pressure to help us awaken people who have high blood pressure and aren’t doing anything to manage it, before it’s too late,” said AMA President David O. Barbe, M.D. “Our goal is to reach more Americans living with uncontrolled high blood pressure to help them realize that working with their doctor to create an individualized treatment plan is the most effective way to help them maintain a lower blood pressure, reduce their risk for serious health consequences and ultimately save their life.”

Research suggests that adults with high blood pressure don’t always realize that their treatment plan can be modified to fit their lives, and they face several barriers to sticking to a plan--time, willpower and consistency with medication are the most frequently mentioned challenges. It has also been shown that awareness of the serious consequences of uncontrolled high blood pressure motivates people to take action to manage their condition. With this in mind, the campaign empowers patients to talk to a doctor and address this important issue together.

The campaign encourages viewers to visit LowerYourHBP.org and BajeSuPresion.org to find resources in English and Spanish that will help them understand their numbers, commit to a plan in partnership with their doctor and learn to manage their blood pressure. The digital experience also includes stories of people who experienced a heart attack or stroke because of high blood pressure.

“The stark imagery of the creative reframes high blood pressure numbers from something abstract and intangible to something visceral and important,” said Ad Council President & CEO Lisa Sherman. “But the work is also incredibly motivating because it reminds people that they have the support they need to prevent the devastating side effects of high blood pressure.”

“The honest power of these different personalities, the openness in which they revealed their physical and psychological scars will make people who write-off high blood pressure as just a number, immediately re-think the issue. Hopefully a lot of people’s lives will change or even be saved because of this effort. And that’s a tremendous reward for all of us involved,” said Havas Adrenaline Chief Creative Officer Rich Russo.

The American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and American Medical Association are also working with their local offices, affiliates and partners to promote and activate the campaign in their communities, with evidence-based materials to aid physicians and other health care providers in the plan-building process.

###

American Heart Association

The American Heart Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease, is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke –  the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

American Medical Association

The American Medical Association is the premier national organization providing timely, essential resources to empower physicians, residents and medical students to succeed at every phase of their medical lives. Physicians have entrusted the AMA to advance the art and science of medicine and the betterment of public health on behalf of patients for more than 170 years. For more information, visit ama-assn.org.

Ad Council

The Ad Council brings together the most creative minds in advertising and media to address the most worthy causes. Its innovative, pro bono social good campaigns raise awareness. They inspire action. They save lives. To learn more, visit Adcouncil.org, follow the Ad Council’s communities on Facebook and Twitter, and view the creative on YouTube.

Media Contacts:

Ad Council

Shareeza Bhola

sbhola@adcouncil.org

(212) 984-1910

American Heart Association

Maggie Francis

maggie.francis@heart.org

(214) 706-1382

American Medical Association

Kelly Jakubek

Kelly.Jakubek@ama-assn.org

(312) 464-4443

Havas

Carly Wengrover

carly.wengrover@havas.com

(212) 886- 2736

]]>Program NewsHeart NewsThu, 16 Nov 2017 11:10:04 GMTNew York, NY, November 16, 2017: Today the American Heart Association (AHA), American Stroke Association (ASA), and the American Medical Association (AMA) announced a new public service awareness (PSA) campaign in partnership with the Ad Council. The...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/using-real-patient-stories-new-psa-campaign-urges-americans-to-bring-high-blood-pressure-under-controlThu, 16 Nov 2017 11:10:00 GMT

Treating gum disease may help lower blood pressure

Tue, 11/14/2017 - 17:28
Study Highlight:

  • Intensive treatment of gum disease, or periodontitis, was associated with a significant decrease in blood pressure among patients at risk for developing high blood pressure in this Chinese study.

Embargoed until 3 p.m. PT/ 6 p.m. ET, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017

This news release contains updated study information not reflected in the abstract.

ANAHEIM, California, Nov. 14, 2017 — Treatment for gum disease, or periodontitis, significantly lowered blood pressure among Chinese patients at risk for developing high blood pressure, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

This small study compared blood pressure levels after standard and intensive treatment for gum disease. The standard treatment included basic oral hygiene instructions and teeth cleaning with plaque removal above the gum line. The intensive treatment included the standard treatment along with cleaning down to the roots with local anesthesia, antibiotic treatment and dental extractions, if necessary.

Researchers found:

  • One month after treatment, systolic blood pressure was nearly 3 points lower in participants receiving intensive treatment, but no significant difference was observed in diastolic blood pressure.
  • Three months after treatment, systolic blood pressure was nearly 8 points lower and diastolic pressure was nearly 4 points lower in patients receiving intensive treatment.
  • Six months after treatment, systolic blood pressure was nearly 13 points and diastolic blood pressure was almost 10 points lower in patients receiving intensive treatment.

“The present study demonstrates for the first time that intensive periodontal intervention alone can reduce blood pressure levels, inhibit inflammation and improve endothelial function,” said study lead author Jun Tao, M.D., Ph.D., chief of the department of Hypertension and Vascular Disease and director of the Institute of Geriatrics Research at The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China.

Study participants included 107 Chinese women and men age 18 years and over with prehypertension and moderate to severe gum disease. Through random assignment, half of the participants received standard treatment and half received intensive treatment for gum disease.

Researchers noted additional research with patients from diverse backgrounds is needed.

In the United States, high blood pressure affects 29.1 percent of adults aged 18 and over in 2011 – 2012. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart and blood vessel disease. Fortunately, most people can manage the disease through diet and lifestyle changes, such as quitting smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, being physically active, limiting alcohol and taking prescribed medications properly.

Co-authors are Jun-Ying Yang, M.D.; Qian-Bing Zhou, M.D.; Wen-Hao Xia, M.D., Ph.D.; Jing Ren, M.D.; Chen Su, M.D., Ph.D., and Xiao-Yu Zhang, M.D., Ph.D. Author disclosures are on the abstract.

The National Science and Technology Pillar Program funded the study.

Note: Scientific presentation is 4:45 p.m. PT, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017.

Presentation location: 209AB (Main Building)

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Nov. 11-15, 2017 at the Anaheim Convention Center: 714-765-2004.

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

]]>Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsTue, 14 Nov 2017 23:00:04 GMTStudy Highlight: Intensive treatment of gum disease, or periodontitis, was associated with a significant decrease in blood pressure among patients at risk for developing high blood pressure in this Chinese study. https://newsroom.heart.org/news/treating-gum-disease-may-help-lower-blood-pressureTue, 14 Nov 2017 23:00:00 GMT

Sleep deprivation may increase risk of cardiovascular disease in older women

Tue, 11/14/2017 - 16:26
Embargoed until 2:20 p.m. PT/5:20 p.m. ET, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017

ANAHEIM, California, Nov. 14, 2017 — Older women who don’t get enough sleep were more likely to have poor cardiovascular health, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

In the new study, researchers considered sleeping at least two hours more during the weekend than on the weekday as a sign of being in sleep debt. Among the roughly 21,500 female health professionals between ages of 60 and 84 the research team followed, women who were in sleep debt were more likely to be obese and have hypertension. When taking into account socioeconomic status and sources of stress, such as negative life events and work-related stress that could also influence cardiovascular health, quality of sleep was still an important factor for good overall cardiovascular health. The results suggest that not getting enough sleep during the week might throw the body off and may increase risk of cardiovascular disease in older women.

Tomas Cabeza De Baca, Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco

Presentation location: Population Forum, Science & Technology Hall

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Nov. 11-15, 2017 at the Anaheim Convention Center: 714-765-2004.

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

 

]]>Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsTue, 14 Nov 2017 22:20:04 GMTANAHEIM, California, Nov. 14, 2017 — Older women who don’t get enough sleep were more likely to have poor cardiovascular health, according to preliminary research presented at the...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/sleep-deprivation-may-increase-risk-of-cardiovascular-disease-in-older-womenTue, 14 Nov 2017 22:20:00 GMT

E-cigarettes are more likely to be used by alcohol drinkers and former cigarette smokers

Tue, 11/14/2017 - 16:26
Embargoed until 1:30 p.m. PT/ 4:30 p.m. ET, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017

ANAHEIM, California, Nov. 14, 2017 — Electronic cigarettes are more frequently used by people who recently quit smoking and alcohol drinkers, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Researchers examined data from 5,423 individuals with recorded tobacco use in the 2013-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). A total of 116 (2.6 percent) of NHANES participants were found to use e-cigarettes.

They found electronic cigarettes were used by 8 percent of people who never smoked. When compared to individuals who never used any tobacco products, e-cigarette users were:

  • 6.32 times as likely to be exposed to second-hand tobacco smoke.
  • 4.19 times as likely to report drinking alcohol 12 times or more in the last 12 months.
  • Less likely to be college graduates, illicit drug users and people with an income of at least $75,000.

Compared to other tobacco users, e-cigarette users were more likely to be current or former smokers. Former smokers were 23 times likely to use e-cigarette, within the last three months of quitting cigarettes.

With an observed trend, the longer the time duration since quitting cigarettes, the lower the difference was between e-cigarette users and other tobacco users. However, the difference remained large and significant for all time intervals, researchers said.

The American Heart Association cautions against the use of e-cigarettes, stating that e-cigarettes containing nicotine are tobacco products that should be subject to all laws that apply to these products. The association also calls for strong new regulations to prevent access, sales and marketing of e-cigarettes to youth, and for more research into the product’s health impact.

Authors are Rana M. Jaber, Ph.D.; Mohammadhassan Mirbolouk, MD.; Andrew P. DeFilippis, Ph.D.; Wasim Maziak, MD.; Ron Blankstein, Ph.D.; Anshul Saxena, Ph.D. and Thomas Payne, Ph.D., Rachel Keith, Ph.D., Benjamin Emelia, MD., Bhatnagar Aruni, Ph.D., Michael J. Blaha, MD., Khurram Nasir, MD.

American Heart Association Tobacco Regulation and Addiction Center (A-TRAC) funded the study.

Rana M. Jaber, Ph.D., Baptist Health South Florida, Coral Gables.

Note: Scientific presentation is 1:30 p.m. PT, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017.

Presentation location: Population Science Section, Science and Technology Hall

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Nov. 11-15, 2017 at the Anaheim Convention Center: 714-765-2004.

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

]]>Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsTue, 14 Nov 2017 21:30:05 GMTANAHEIM, California, Nov. 14, 2017 — Electronic cigarettes are more frequently used by people who recently quit smoking and alcohol drinkers, according to preliminary research presented...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/e-cigarettes-are-more-likely-to-be-used-by-alcohol-drinkers-and-former-cigarette-smokersTue, 14 Nov 2017 21:30:00 GMT

Stressful events can increase women’s odds of obesity

Tue, 11/14/2017 - 14:21
Study Highlights:

  • Women who reported one or more traumatic lifetime events, such as death of a child, had increased odds of obesity.
  • Women who reported four or more negative events in the last five years, such as unemployed though wanting work, had increased odds of obesity.

Embargoed until 12 p.m. PT /3 p.m. ET, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017

ANAHEIM, California, Nov.14, 2017 — Women who experienced one or more traumatic lifetime events or several negative events in recent years had higher odds of being obese than women who didn’t report such stress, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

“Little is known about how negative and traumatic life events affect obesity in women. We know that stress affects behavior, including whether people under- or overeat, as well as neuro-hormonal activity by in part increasing cortisol production, which is related to weight gain,” said study senior author Michelle A. Albert, M.D., M.P.H., professor of medicine, cardiology, and founding director of the Center for the Study of Adversity and Cardiovascular Disease, at University of California, San Francisco.

Obesity, a preventable risk factor for cardiovascular and other diseases, impacts more than one-third of U.S. adults. According to the American Heart Association, nearly 70 percent of American adults are either overweight or obese.  Women tend to live longer than men, putting especially obese, aging women at greater risk for disease, said study author Eva M. Durazo, Ph.D., a post-doctoral scholar at the NURTURE Center, Division of Cardiology, UCSF said.

The researchers studied the relationship between major life events and obesity in a group of 21,904 middle-aged and older women, focusing on women with the highest obesity prevalence. They defined obesity as having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m2 or higher. And, they measured the impacts of two types of stress: traumatic events, which could occur anytime in a woman’s life and includes such things as death of a child or being a victim of a serious physical attack, as well as negative life events that had occurred in the previous five years of a woman’s life. Negative events included wanting employment but being unemployed for longer than three months or being burglarized.

They found:

  • Nearly a quarter (23 percent) of the women studied were obese.
  • Women who reported greater than one traumatic life event versus no traumatic life events had 11 percent increased odds of obesity.
  • The higher the number of negative life events reported by women in the last five years, the higher the tendency for increased odds of obesity. Specifically, women who reported four or more negative life events had a 36 percent higher risk of obesity, compared to women who reported no such events.
  • Among women who had higher levels of physical activity, there was a stronger association between increasing cumulative/chronic stress and obesity, though the reason for this finding remains uncertain.

“Our findings suggest that psychological stress in the form of negative and traumatic life events might represent an important risk factor for weight changes and, therefore, we should consider including assessment and treatment of psychosocial stress in approaches to weight management,” Albert said.

Because the study looks at the association between stressful events and obesity in a snapshot of time, future studies should look at the relationship longitudinally, following people for weight gain over time after life events have occurred, according to Albert.

“This is important work because women are living longer and are more at risk for chronic illnesses, such as cardiovascular disease. The potential public health impact is large, as obesity is related to increased risks of heart attack, stroke, diabetes and cancer, and contributes to spiraling healthcare costs,” Albert said.

Co-authors are Fumika Matsushita, M.P.H.; Alan M. Zaslavsky, Ph.D.; Tiffany Powell-Wiley, M.D., M.P.H.; Natalie Slopen, Sc.D. and Julie E. Buring, Sc.D. Author disclosures are on the abstract.

The National Institute on Aging, National Cancer Institute and National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute funded the study.

Presentation location: Population Science Section, Science & Technology Hall

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Nov. 11-15, 2017 at the Anaheim Convention Center: 714-765-2004

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsTue, 14 Nov 2017 20:00:07 GMTStudy Highlights: Women who reported one or more traumatic lifetime events, such as death of a child, had increased odds of obesity. Women who reported four or more negative events in the last five years, such as unemployed though wanting work, had...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/stressful-events-can-increase-womens-odds-of-obesityTue, 14 Nov 2017 20:00:00 GMT

Heat-not-burn tobacco products may be ‘not so hot’ at protecting blood vessel function

Tue, 11/14/2017 - 14:21
Embargoed until 12 p.m. PT/ 3 p.m. ET, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017

This news tip contains updated study information not reflected in the abstract.

ANAHEIM, California, Nov. 14, 2017 — Heat-not-burn devices may eliminate users’ exposure to tobacco smoke, but the vapor they produce has the same negative impact on blood vessel function as smoking, according to a preliminary animal study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Heat-not-burn products are not new, but have been recently updated and test marketed in several countries outside the United States with greater success. Despite tobacco industry claims of heat-not-burn products being less harmful than regular cigarettes, the health effects of the devices are still unproven, according to researchers.

Heat-not-burn devices raise the temperature of tobacco enough to release nicotine-containing vapor but not enough to burn, avoiding smoke exposure. To test the devices’ ability to reduce harm, researchers assessed whether exposure to the vapor affects the ability of rats’ blood vessels to widen when there is increased blood flow – a measure of blood vessel health that is impaired with exposure to smoke from cigarettes, small cigars and marijuana.

Researchers found:

  • After ten 15-second exposures over five minutes to the vapor from iQOS, a heat-not-burn device that has been test-marketed in several countries, blood vessel function decreased by 58 percent.
  • Similarly, after ten 5-second exposures over five minutes to iQOS vapor, blood vessel function decreased by a similar amount, 60 percent.
  • The reduction was comparable to that induced by cigarette smoke (57 percent for the 15-second exposures, 62 percent for the 5-second exposures).
  • Exposure to clean air had no impact on blood vessel dilation.
  • The amount of nicotine in the rats’ blood after exposure to cigarette smoke was similar to the amount in blood after humans have smoked one cigarette, confirming that the exposure conditions were relevant to the real world. However, the amount of nicotine in the blood after exposure to iQOS vapor was substantially higher (70.3 nanogram/milliliter for iQOS, 15.0 nanogram/milliliter for cigarettes).

Using heat-not-burn products may not avoid the adverse cardiovascular effects of smoking cigarettes.

The research was conducted by Pooneh Nabavizadeh, M.D. in a group led by Matthew L. Springer, Ph.D. Other contributors were Jiangtao Liu, M.D., Sharina Ibrahim, B.Sc. and Ronak Derakhshandeh, M.S.

The study was funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Tobacco Products. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH or the FDA.

Matthew L. Springer, Ph.D., UCSF School of Medicine, San Francisco, California.

Presentation Location: Basic Science Section, Science and Technology Hall

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Nov. 11-15, 2017 at the Anaheim Convention Center: 714-765-2004

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsTue, 14 Nov 2017 20:00:04 GMTANAHEIM, California, Nov. 14, 2017 — Heat-not-burn devices may eliminate users’ exposure to tobacco smoke,...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/heat-not-burn-tobacco-products-may-be-not-so-hot-at-protecting-blood-vessel-functionTue, 14 Nov 2017 20:00:00 GMT

Heart failure in methamphetamine users: could this be the next epidemic among vets?

Tue, 11/14/2017 - 13:19
Study Highlights:

  • Heart failure associated with methamphetamine use is on the rise among U.S. veterans.
  • In this study, meth users with heart failure, who were an average age of 61, were notably younger than heart failure patients, whose average age was 72 years.
  • The combination of heart failure and methamphetamine use results in more emergency department visits than for heart failure without methamphetamine use.

Embargoed until 10:30 a.m. PT/1:30 p.m. ET, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017

Please note researcher updated results information in release on 11/8/2017.

ANAHEIM, California, Nov. 14, 2017 — Heart failure associated with methamphetamine (meth) use has risen dramatically in recent years among U.S. veterans, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Meth abuse is a serious problem in America, with more than 4.7 percent of the population reporting that they’ve tried the highly addictive stimulant drug at least once.

“Methamphetamine (or meth) is one of the most commonly used drugs in the United States, and its use is on the rise. In addition to other health problems associated with the drug, clinicians are seeing more heart failure with meth use, suggesting heart failure due to methamphetamine use could be a new epidemic,” said study author Marin Nishimura, M.D., internal medicine resident, University of California, San Diego.

Nishimura and colleagues studied 9,588 Veterans Administration (VA) patients at the San Diego VA Medical Center diagnosed with heart failure from 2005 and 2015. Among those, 480 were documented to have a history of meth abuse. They found:

  • The proportion of meth use rose from 1.7 percent among VA heart failure patients in 2005 to 8 percent in 2015.
  • Heart failure patients with and without meth use had notable similarities and differences. Among the similarities, was the level of heart function, known as ejection fraction, between the two groups. Among the differences: Meth users were less likely to have atrial fibrillation (a quivering or irregular heartbeat or arrhythmia that can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications) than non-meth users, and meth users were less likely to have significant coronary artery disease than non-meth users.
  • Meth users with heart failure, who were average age 61, were notably younger than heart failure patients, whose average age was 72 years.
  • Meth users were more likely to have psychiatric issues, such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD.
  • Meth patients tended to visit the emergency department more often compared to heart failure patients without meth use.

“The finding that meth users are more likely to be affected by psychiatric illnesses and tended to require more emergency department visits has important implications because they impact the cost of healthcare and healthcare utilization,” Nishimura said. Addressing the increased healthcare needs of meth users with heart failure could mean establishing better relationships with primary care doctors who can check on whether these patients’ health is stable to avoid emergency care and hospitalization, according to Nishimura.

More research into the association of meth use and heart failure is needed, according to the researcher. “Our finding is based on a single center and only is based on the very specific population of the veterans in San Diego, so this should be looked at in other populations,” she said.

Co-authors are Janet Ma, M.D.; Isac C Thomas, M.D.; Sutton Fox, M.P.H.; Avinash Toomu; Sean Mojaver; Derek Juang, M.D. and Alan Maisel, M.D. Author disclosures are on the abstract.  There was no funding for this study.

Presentation location: Clinical Section, Science & Technology Hall

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Nov. 11-15, 2017 at the Anaheim Convention Center: 714-765-2004.

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsTue, 14 Nov 2017 18:30:07 GMTStudy Highlights: Heart failure associated with methamphetamine use is on the rise among U.S. veterans. In this study, meth users with heart failure, who were an average age of 61, were notably younger than heart failure patients, whose average age...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/heart-failure-in-methamphetamine-users-could-this-be-the-next-epidemic-among-vetsTue, 14 Nov 2017 18:30:00 GMT

Australian workers who smoke hit national pocketbook

Tue, 11/14/2017 - 13:19
Embargoed until 10:30 a.m. PT/ 1:30 p.m. ET, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017

This news tip contains updated study information not reflected in the abstract.

ANAHEIM, California, Nov. 14, 2017Smoking among the working population is predicted to cost Australia an estimated $340 billion in lost productivity, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

The health costs of smoking are well-known, but the impact on productivity is not. Currently, 1.9 million Australians (13.9 percent) between 20 and 69 years of age are smokers.

Researchers used published data on the rate of deaths, absenteeism, and working while sick among smokers to estimate how much productivity would be lost to smoking in the working-age population until age 69. They found that:

  • Australia’s currently smoking workforce would lose an estimated 2.9 million years of life and 2.7 million years of productive years lost, equating to an estimated $340 billion in U.S. dollars – not including healthcare expenditures.
  • This represents a 6 percent loss in productive years and a 4 percent loss in years of life compared to a non-smoking workforce.

These results highlight the importance of smoking prevention, the researchers said.

Monash University funded the study.

Salsabil Bilqis Maulida, Medical Student, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia Danny Liew, Ph.D., Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.

Presentation Location: Population Science Section, Science and Technology Hall

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Nov. 11-15, 2017 at the Anaheim Convention Center: 714-765-2004

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsTue, 14 Nov 2017 18:30:05 GMTANAHEIM, California, Nov. 14, 2017 — Smoking among the working population is predicted to cost...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/australian-workers-who-smoke-hit-national-pocketbookTue, 14 Nov 2017 18:30:00 GMT

Pregnant Asian women who develop high blood pressure at highest risk for heart failure hospitalizations

Tue, 11/14/2017 - 12:12
Embargoed until 9:45 a.m. PT/12:45 p.m. ET, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017

ANAHEIM, California, Nov.14, 2017 — Women who develop high blood pressure  during pregnancy are more likely to experience heart problems within a few years of giving birth, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Researchers from University of California San Francisco followed the time to hospitalization from heart failure (a condition when the heart can’t pump well) and heart attack for nearly 1.6 million women in California. Women who experienced any form of pregnancy-related hypertension — gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, chronic hypertension and chronic hypertension combined with preeclampsia — were more frequently hospitalized for heart failure than women who did not experience high blood pressure during pregnancy. However, the likelihood of heart failure hospitalization depended on the patient’s racial background: Black women had the lowest likelihood of heart failure hospitalization while Asian/Pacific Islander women had the highest. White and Hispanic/Latina women fell between the two groups.

Women who experienced gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and chronic hypertension were also more likely to be hospitalized for a heart attack, but unlike with heart failure, the likelihood of hospitalization for heart attack was not influenced by racial background. The analysis demonstrates that racial background influences risk of heart failure hospitalization but not hospitalization for heart attack in women with pregnancy-related hypertension.

Leila Y. Beach, M.D., University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine.

Note: Scientific presentation is 9:45 a.m. PT, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017.

Presentation location:  208AB (Main Building)

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Nov. 11-15, 2017 at the Anaheim Convention Center: 714-765-2004.

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

 

]]>Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsTue, 14 Nov 2017 17:46:04 GMTANAHEIM, California, Nov.14, 2017 — Women who develop high blood pressure  during pregnancy are more likely to experience heart problems within a few years of giving birth, according...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/pregnant-asian-women-who-develop-high-blood-pressure-at-highest-risk-for-heart-failure-hospitalizationsTue, 14 Nov 2017 17:45:00 GMT

Catastrophic costs for hospitalization expenses common among uninsured heart and stroke patients

Mon, 11/13/2017 - 17:55
Study Highlights:

  • Among Americans 18 to 64 years old, 15 percent of all heart attack and stroke patients and 9 percent of patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery were uninsured before passage of the Affordable Care Act.
  • For those who were uninsured, hospitalization expenses were catastrophic for 85 percent of heart attack patients, 75 percent of stroke patients and 80 percent of CABG patients.

Embargoed until 3 p.m. PT/6 p.m. ET, Monday, Nov. 13, 2017

This news release is featured in an 8 a.m. PT embargoed briefing on Sunday, Nov. 12, 2017.

ANAHEIM, California, Nov. 13, 2017 — The majority of patients without health insurance who were hospitalized for heart attack, stroke or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery experienced catastrophic healthcare expenses before passage of the Affordable Care Act, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Using data from the National Inpatient Sample, the largest publicly available all-payer inpatient healthcare database in the United States, research reported in presentation 293 found that 15 percent of all heart attack and stroke patients were uninsured during the study period 2008-2012. Using the same data set, research reported in poster presentation T5082 found that 9 percent of patients who underwent CABG were uninsured during the study period 2008-2012. The researchers, who collaborated on the studies, found that among this group of uninsured people, hospital bills exceeded the threshold for a catastrophic health expenses for: 

  • 85 percent of heart attack patients;
  • 75 percent of stroke patients; and
  • 83 percent of CABG patients.

During the years of the study, the median hospitalization charges for heart attacks were $53,384; strokes were $31,218. The cost for coronary artery bypass surgeries ranged from $85,891-$177,546.

Catastrophic health expenditures were defined as hospitalization expenses that exceeded 40 percent of annual income after eliminating the cost of food. For many these medical costs make it difficult to pay for housing, transportation and other essential expenses. Annual patient income was determined using data from the U.S. Census and food costs were estimated from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

“Medical bankruptcy is the leading cause of bankruptcy in the United States,” said Rohan Khera, M.D., first author of the study that examined hospitalization expenses of heart attack and stroke patients and a cardiology fellow at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. “Until there is universal insurance coverage, a catastrophic health experience is very likely to turn into a catastrophic financial experience as well.”

Heart attacks, strokes, and CABG — a surgery that reroutes blood around clogged coronary arteries and improves the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart muscle— are major, unanticipated healthcare events that require immediate and often costly treatment. The financial burden of heart disease treatment is well documented for patients with health insurance, but little is known about the financial implications for uninsured patients who need care.

“Catastrophic health expenses are an important factor for physicians to consider, and should be thought of as an adverse effect when hospitalization is required for uninsured patients in the United States,” said Jonathan C. Hong, M.D., first author of the study that analyzed hospitalization expenses for CABG and a cardiac surgery resident at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada.

“The majority of uninsured patients undergoing CABG will experience significant financial hardships that are often unexpected and difficult to plan for,” Hong said. “Health policy that expands insurance coverage can help mitigate the economic burden for this life-saving procedure among this patient population.”

“Although there is still a substantial number of people who are uninsured, the Affordable Care Act increased the number of people who do have insurance. Therefore, the number of people at risk for catastrophic healthcare expenses may have declined. The law also improves the ability to get insurance for people with medical illnesses given its protections for patients with pre-existing conditions,” said Khera

Co-authors of the heart attack and stroke study are Hong, Anshul Saxena, Ph.D., M.P.H., Alejandro Arrieta, Ph.D., Salim S. Virani, Ph.D., Ron Blankstein, M.D., James A. de Lemos, M.D., Harlan M. Krumholz, M.D. and Khurram Nasir, M.D.

Co-authors of the CABG study are Khera, Anshul Saxena, Ph.D., M.P.H., Alejandro Arrieta, Ph.D., Salim S. Virani, Ph.D., Ron Blankstein, M.D., Glenn J.R. Whitman, M.D., Harlan M. Krumholz, M.D., and Khurram Nasir, M.D. Author disclosures are on the abstracts.

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences funded the heart attack and stroke study.

Note: Scientific presentation time for Dr. Khera’s study (293) is at 5:45 p.m. PT, Monday, Nov. 13, 2017 in room 213B (Main Building).  Scientific presentation time for Dr. Hong’s study (T5082) is at 1:30 p.m. PT, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017 in the Clinical III Section, Science and Technology Hall

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Nov. 11-16, 2017 at the Anaheim Convention Center: (714) 765-2004

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsMon, 13 Nov 2017 23:00:06 GMTStudy Highlights: Among Americans 18 to 64 years old, 15 percent of all heart attack and stroke patients and 9 percent of patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery were uninsured before passage of the Affordable Care Act. https://newsroom.heart.org/news/catastrophic-costs-for-hospitalization-expenses-common-among-uninsured-heart-and-stroke-patientsMon, 13 Nov 2017 23:00:00 GMT

Driving a Tesla may not trip your defibrillator

Mon, 11/13/2017 - 17:55
Embargoed until 3 p.m. PT/ 6 p.m. ET, Monday, Nov. 13, 2017

ANAHEIM, California, Nov. 13, 2017 — Sitting in, or standing close to the charging port of a Tesla electric vehicle didn’t trigger a shock or interfere with implantable defibrillator performance, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Researchers examined the potential effect of electromagnetic interference while charging an electric vehicle battery at 220 Volts. The study included 26 men and 8 women from Good Samaritan Hospital in Dayton, Ohio, average age 69, with implanted cardiac defibrillators of various types.

Adjusting the defibrillators to both their least and most sensitive settings, the devices did not sense the electromagnetic signal from the electric vehicle battery when patients sat in the driver’s seat, passenger seat, backseat or at the charging post (where the electromagnetic interference is at its highest).

These findings suggest that electric vehicles may be safe to use for individuals with cardiac defibrillators, according to the principal investigator, Abdul Wase, M.D. and his team.

Thein Tun Aung, M.D. and Abdul Wase, M.D., Good Samaritan Hospital, Dayton, Ohio.

Presentation Location: Clinical Science Section, Science and Technology Hall

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Nov. 11-15, 2017 at the Anaheim Convention Center: 714-765-2004

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsMon, 13 Nov 2017 23:00:03 GMTANAHEIM, California, Nov. 13, 2017 — Sitting in, or standing close to the charging port of a Tesla electric vehicle didn’t trigger a shock or interfere with implantable defibrillator...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/driving-a-tesla-may-not-trip-your-defibrillatorMon, 13 Nov 2017 23:00:00 GMT

Plant based diet associated with less heart failure risk

Mon, 11/13/2017 - 15:44
Study Highlight:

  • Eating a mostly plant-based diet was associated with a 42 percent reduced risk of developing heart failure among people without diagnosed heart disease or heart failure.  

Embargoed until 12:45 p.m. PT/3:45 p.m. ET, Monday, Nov. 13, 2017

This news release is featured in an 8 a.m. PT embargoed briefing on Sunday, November 12, 2017 

ANAHEIM, California, Nov. 13, 2017 — Eating a mostly plant-based diet was associated with less risk of developing heart failure among people without previously diagnosed heart disease or heart failure, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

The study looked at five different dietary patterns and, according to the author, found that people who ate a plant-based diet most of the time had a 42 percent decreased risk of developing heart failure over the four years of the study, compared to people who ate fewer plant-based foods. Other dietary patterns, described as convenience, sweets, Southern or alcohol/salads style were not associated with a decreased risk for heart failure. Heart failure, a chronic, progressive condition in which the heart muscle is unable to pump enough blood to maintain its workload, affects about 6.5 million adults over age 20 in the United States.

Previous studies have shown that what people eat can play an important role in increasing or decreasing the risk of atherosclerosis, the slow narrowing of the arteries that underlies heart attacks, most strokes and heart failure. This study focuses specifically on whether diet can influence the development of heart failure among people with no diagnosed heart disease.

“Eating a diet mostly of dark green leafy plants, fruits, beans, whole grains and fish, while limiting processed meats, saturated fats, trans fats, refined carbohydrates and foods high in added sugars is a heart-healthy lifestyle and may specifically help prevent heart failure if you don't already have it,” said Kyla Lara, M.D., first author of the study and an internal medicine resident at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, New York.

The researchers used data collected for the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS), a nationwide observational study of risk factors for stroke in adults 45 years or older sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. The participants, who were recruited from 2003 to 2007 and followed through 2013, included 15,569 patients without known coronary artery disease or heart failure. Incidents of heart failure within this group were confirmed by health care providers. Over the nearly 3000 days of follow up, 300 instances of hospitalizations for incident heart failure were reported.

Participants in the REGARDS study reported their diets using a food frequency questionnaire, a standard method for classifying diets that uses statistical modeling to assign a person’s diet to one of five dietary patterns:

  • Convenience (red meats, pastas, fried potatoes, fast foods);
  • Plant-based (dark, leafy vegetables, fruits, beans, fish);
  • Sweets (desserts, breads, sweet breakfast foods, chocolate, candy);
  • Southern (eggs, fried food, organ meats, processed meats, sugar-sweetened beverages)
  • Alcohol/Salads (salad dressings, green, leafy vegetables, tomatoes, wine, butter, liquor).

The researchers found that of the five dietary patterns, greater adherence to the plant-based diet had the strongest association with a decreased risk of incident heart failure when adjusted for age, sex and race of the participants and for other risk factors. No associations for the other four dietary patterns were found.

The study was observational, which means it can identify a trend or association, but cannot prove cause and effect.

The American Heart Association recommends a dietary pattern that includes a variety of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, poultry, fish, beans, non-tropical vegetable oils, and nuts; and limits intake of sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages, and red meats.

Co-authors are Emily B. Levitan, Sc.D., Orlando M. Gutierrez, M.D., James M Shikany, Dr. P.H., Monika M. Safford, M.D., Suzanne E. Judd, Ph.D., and Robert S. Rosenson, M.D. Author disclosures are on the abstract.

Note: Scientific presentation is at 12:45 p.m. PT, Monday, November 13, 2017.

Presentation location: Population Science Section, Science and Technology Hall.

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Nov. 11-16, 2017 at the Anaheim Convention Center: (714) 765-2004

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsMon, 13 Nov 2017 20:46:03 GMTStudy Highlight: Eating a mostly plant-based diet was associated with a 42 percent reduced risk of developing heart failure among people without diagnosed heart disease or heart failure.   https://newsroom.heart.org/news/plant-based-diet-associated-with-less-heart-failure-riskMon, 13 Nov 2017 20:45:00 GMT

Drinking coffee may be associated with reduced risk of heart failure and stroke

Mon, 11/13/2017 - 12:38
Study Highlights:

  • Drinking coffee may be associated with decreased risk of heart failure and stroke.
  • Machine learning may be an effective way to analyze data to discover new ways to predict the risk of heart failure and stroke.

Embargoed until 10:30 a.m. PT/1:30 p.m. ET, Monday, Nov. 13, 2017  

This news release is featured in an 8 a.m. PT news briefing on Sunday, Nov. 12, 2017.

ANAHEIM, California, November13, 2017 — Drinking coffee may be associated with a decreased risk of developing heart failure or having stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Researchers used machine learning to analyze data from the long-running Framingham Heart Study, which includes information about what people eat and their cardiovascular health. They found that drinking coffee was associated with decreased risk of developing heart failure by 7 percent and stroke by 8 percent with every additional cup of coffee consumed per week compared with non-coffee drinkers. It is important to note that this type of study design demonstrates an observed association, but does not prove cause and effect.

Machine learning, works by finding associations within data, much in the same way that online shopping sites predict products you may like based on your shopping history, and is one type of big data analysis. To ensure the validity of their results and determine direction of risk, the researchers further investigated the machine learning results using traditional analysis in two studies with similar sets of data - the Cardiovascular Heart Study and the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study. The association between drinking coffee and a decreased risk of heart failure and stroke was consistently noted in all three studies.

While many risk factors for heart failure and stroke are well known, the researchers believe it is likely that there are as-yet unidentified risk factors. “Our findings suggest that machine learning could help us identify additional factors to improve existing risk assessment models. The risk assessment tools we currently use for predicting whether someone might develop heart disease, particularly heart failure or stroke, are very good but they are not 100 percent accurate,” said Laura M. Stevens, B.S., first author of the study and a doctoral student at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, Colorado and Data Scientist for the Precision Medicine Institute at the American Heart Association in Dallas, Texas..

Another potential risk factor identified by machine-learning analysis was red-meat consumption, although the association between red meat consumption and heart failure or stroke was less clear. Eating red meat was associated with decreased risk of heart failure and stroke in the Framingham Heart Study but validating the finding in comparable studies is more challenging due to differences in the definitions of red meat between studies. Further investigation to better determine how red meat consumption affects risk for heart failure and stroke is ongoing.

The researchers also built a predictive model using known risk factors from the Framingham Risk Score such as blood pressure, age and other patient characteristics associated with cardiovascular disease. “By including coffee in the model, the prediction accuracy increased by 4 percent. Machine learning may a useful addition to the way we look at data and help us find new ways to lower the risk of heart failure and strokes,” said David Kao, M.D., senior author of the study and an assistant professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, Colorado.

The American Heart Association suggest limiting red meat, which is high in saturated fat, as part of a healthy dietary pattern that should emphasize, fruit, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, poultry and fish.

Co-author is Carsten Görg, Ph.D. Author disclosures are on the abstract.

The American Heart Association and the University of Colorado School of Medicine funded the study.

Presentation location: Population Science Section, Science and Technology Hall.

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Nov. 11-16, 2017 at the Anaheim Convention Center: (714) 765-2004

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsMon, 13 Nov 2017 18:30:07 GMTStudy Highlights: Drinking coffee may be associated with decreased risk of heart failure and stroke. Machine learning may be an effective way to analyze data to discover new ways to predict the risk of heart failure and stroke. https://newsroom.heart.org/news/drinking-coffee-may-be-associated-with-reduced-risk-of-heart-failure-and-strokeMon, 13 Nov 2017 18:30:00 GMT

Sudden cardiac death rates may be seven times higher among young people with diabetes

Mon, 11/13/2017 - 12:38
Study Highlights:

  • Children and young adults with diabetes were seven times more likely to die from sudden cardiac death compared to children and young adults without diabetes in a Danish study.
  • This same group was found to be eight times more likely to die from any kind of heart disease compared to children and young adults without diabetes.

Embargoed until 10:30 a.m.PT/1:30 p.m. ET, Monday, November 13, 2017

This news release is featured in an 8 a.m. PT embargoed briefing on Sunday, November 12, 2017

ANAHEIM, California, November 13, 2017 — Children and young adults with diabetes may be seven times more likely to die from sudden cardiac death compared to children and young adults without diabetes, according to preliminary research from Denmark presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.                                                       

Sudden cardiac death is defined as a sudden, unexpected death that occurs instantly or shortly after symptoms appear. It is often caused by malfunctions in the heart's electrical system. The study, which was conducted in Denmark, also found that overall, compared to those without diabetes, children and young adults, ages 1-49, with diabetes were eight times more likely to die from any kind of heart disease, such as heart failure or the chronic narrowing of arteries known as atherosclerosis, compared to children and young adults without diabetes.

Young people with diabetes may be at increased risk for sudden cardiac death because of abnormalities in their blood vessels caused by the disease.

“Although we have become better at helping people manage both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, it is still associated with increased risk of death, especially among young people,” said Jesper Svane, B.M., a research student at Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Cardiovascular diseases are a common complication of diabetes and the leading cause of death among people with diabetes. Previous studies have demonstrated that intensive management of risk factors had significant beneficial effects on cardiovascular-related death in persons with diabetes. Therefore, it is of important to monitor people with diabetes in order to identify those at high risk of cardiovascular death.

The study is one of the first to examine causes of death and cause-specific death rates among children and young adults with diabetes in a nationwide setting.

Svane said that because the Danish study population was 89 percent Caucasian, the findings may not be applicable to other western countries, due to differences in demographics and in the organization of the healthcare systems of Denmark and the United States. Other studies have shown that death patterns, especially regarding sudden cardiac death, are heavily influenced by ethnicity, so the findings cannot directly be extended to other countries with more ethnically diverse populations.

The study population consisted of all persons in Denmark age 1 to 35 in 2000-09 and age 36 to 49 in 2007-09. During the 10-year study period 14,294 deaths occurred, and cause of death was established based on information from death certificates and autopsy reports. The Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics, which holds information on all prescriptions dispensed from Danish pharmacies, was used to identify persons with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Among those who died, 669 (5 percent) had diabetes, of which 471 (70 percent) had Type 1 and 198 (30 percent) had Type 2.

“In light of the results from this study, tight control and effective treatment of blood lipids, blood pressure, and blood glucose is also important among children and young persons with diabetes,” said Svane.

“Our study shows the importance of early and continuous cardiovascular risk monitoring in children and young adults with diabetes,” Svane said. “Healthcare providers need to be aware that even young patients with diabetes have elevated risk of mortality and that this is mainly explained by increased risk of sudden cardiac death.”

Co-authors are Thomas H. Lynge, M.D., Ulrik Pedersen-Bjergaard, M.D., Thomas Jespersen, Ph.D., D.Med.Sci., Gunnar H. Gislason, M.D., Ph.D., Bjarke Risgaard, M.D., Ph.D., Bo G. Winkel, M.D., Ph.D., and Jacob Tfelt-Hansen, M.D., D.Med.Sci. Author disclosures are on the abstract.

Note: Scientific presentation is at 10:30 a.m. PT, Monday, November 13, 2017.

Presentation Location: Clinical Science Section, Science and Technology Hall.

Additional Resources:

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

###

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Nov. 11-16, 2017 at the Anaheim Convention Center: (714) 765-2004

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

]]>Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsMon, 13 Nov 2017 18:30:07 GMTStudy Highlights: Children and young adults with diabetes were seven times more likely to die from sudden cardiac death compared to children and young adults without diabetes in a Danish study. This same group was found to be eight times more likely...https://newsroom.heart.org/news/sudden-cardiac-death-rates-may-be-seven-times-higher-among-young-people-with-diabetesMon, 13 Nov 2017 18:30:00 GMT

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