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Embargoed 10:30 a.m. PT / 1:30 p.m. ET Sunday, Sept 17, 2017

SAN FRANCISCO, September 2017 — Organ damage from high blood pressure doesn’t only occur in adults; it can also happen in teenagers, according to research presented today at the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions 2017 in San Francisco.

And the damage to the heart and blood vessels can occur in youth at blood pressure levels that are below the clinical definition of hypertension in youth.

High blood pressure in youth is defined differently than it is in adults. In childhood, high blood pressure is based on percentiles, rather than blood pressure level. Researchers looked at whether organ damage in teens develops below the 95th percentile, which is the clinical definition of high blood pressure in youth.

Researchers studied blood pressure and measured organ damage in 180 teenagers (14-17 years old, 64 percent white, 57 percent males). They found evidence of organ damage even among the youth categorized as “normal” with blood pressure less than in the 80th percentile. They also found heart and vessel damage in the mid-risk group, which had blood pressures in the 80th to 90th percentiles and the high-risk group, with blood pressures above the 90th percentile.

“Some adolescents may have organ damage related to blood pressure and are not targeted for therapy,” said Elaine M. Urbina, M.D., M.S., study author and director of preventive cardiology at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Ohio. “Imaging of the heart may be useful in youth in the high-normal range of blood pressure to determine how aggressive therapy should be.”

Additional Resources:

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Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association and American Stroke Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events.  The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

 About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: 214-706-1173

Maggie Francis: 214-706-1382; maggie.francis@heart.org  

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

]]>Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsSun, 17 Sep 2017 17:29:43 GMTHighlights: Organ damage from high blood pressure doesn’t only occur in adults; it can also happen in teenagers, according to research presented today at the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions 2017 in San Francisco.http://newsroom.heart.org/news/teens-also-at-risk-for-organ-damage-from-high-blood-pressureSun, 17 Sep 2017 17:30:00 GMT
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 16, 2017— Two leading hypertension researchers will be honored today at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension, Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, and the American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions in San Francisco.

This year’s recipients of the annual Excellence Award for Hypertension Research are Allyn L. Mark, M.D., professor of internal medicine-cardiovascular medicine, at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, and Richard J. Roman, Ph.D., Billy S. Gutyon Distinguished Professor and Chair of pharmacology and toxicology at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Both will present lectures on their work and receive their awards during a special dinner at the Scientific Sessions meeting.

Mark’s research has explored the roles of the brain and sympathetic nervous system in controlling blood pressure.

“Our research looked at two major contributors to hypertension: obesity and high salt intake,” Mark said. “We wanted to understand why some individuals are sensitive and other individuals are resistant to the hypertensive effects of high salt intake, as well as recognize the underlying causes of hypertension caused by obesity.”

Roman has devoted his career to studying how genes impact hypertension as well as determining patients’ susceptibility to kidney and brain damage. His team identified a gene that produces a compound called 20-HETE. This compound constricts blood vessels, and, in the kidney, it increases sodium excretion.

“Gene mutations that reduce 20-HETE can lead to hypertension and stroke in humans, and we have recently found that it also is associated with dementia in elderly patients.” Roman said. “This and other research lays the groundwork for much needed clinical trials looking at drugs that target 20-HETE for the treatment of stroke, heart attack and cancer.”

Established in 1966, the Excellence Award for Hypertension honors excellence in research and discoveries in the field of hypertension. Nominees are assessed by a committee on their impact in the field of hypertension throughout their careers, as well as any single discovery. All scientists with a background in hypertension research, and those who have made a meritorious scientific discovery or discoveries, either alone or with others, may be considered.

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About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries: (214) 706-1382

AHA contact: maggie.francis@heart.org

For Public Inquiries: (800) AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Program NewsHeart NewsStroke NewsSun, 17 Sep 2017 15:13:11 GMTSAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 16, 2017— Two leading hypertension researchers will be honored today at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension, Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, and the American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions in San Francisco.http://newsroom.heart.org/news/american-heart-association-honors-scientists-for-excellence-in-groundbreaking-hypertension-researchSat, 16 Sep 2017 14:00:00 GMT
Study Highlights

  • Primary care practices using the Measure accurately, Act rapidly and Partner with patients (MAP) program drove down hypertension rates among patients.
  • In six months of MAP, hypertension control rose from 65.6 percent to 74.8 percent, among more than 21,000 hypertension patients at U.S. primary care practices.

Embargoed 3p.m. PT / 6p.m. ET, Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 16, 2017— A quality improvement program designed to better control hypertension in primary care practices notably improved hypertension control in six months, according to research presented today at the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions 2017, in San Francisco.

One in three American adults has high blood pressure. That number is steadily climbing, despite the fact that high blood pressure can be easily treated using evidence-based guidelines.

Based on the American Medical Association’s M.A.P. Framework, the AMA collaborated with Care Coordination Institute Labs, Greenville South Carolina, to create the M.A.P. hypertension improvement program using the latest science in blood pressure control. It stands for measuring blood pressure accurately; acting rapidly to manage uncontrolled blood pressure; and partnering with patients to promote blood pressure self-management.

“The goal of the M.A.P. is to make it easier for doctors and care teams to help people with hypertension effectively manage their blood pressure,” said study author Michael Rakotz, M.D., vice president of chronic disease prevention at the American Medical Association (AMA), based in Chicago.

Researchers compared blood pressure measurements of more than 21,000 hypertensive patients from 16 practices, comparing their blood pressures from the start of the study to those taken six months into participating in the MAP intervention.

They found:

  • Blood pressure control rose from 65.6 percent to 74.8 percent in six months.
  • Twelve of the 16 practices in the study reported notably better blood pressure control in their hypertensive patients.
  • Among the uncontrolled patients at the study’s start, average blood pressure fell from 149/85 to 139/80 mm Hg.
  • Teaching accurate blood pressure measurement technique resulted in reduced systolic pressures in uncontrolled patients in the office.
  • There was no notable change in physicians increasing the number of or dosage of anti-hypertensive medications to treat patients with uncontrolled blood pressure.
  • There was a significant increase in drop in blood pressure with each medication change made during the study (14 mm Hg), compared to drops in blood pressure with each medication change prior to the study (5.4 mm Hg), implying that either patients are doing better at taking their medications daily or that the medications they are being prescribed are working better, according to Rakotz.

“MAP’s evidence-based strategies offer an opportunity for primary care practices to work with patients to quickly improve blood pressure control. And the initiative goes hand-in-hand with national programs focused on reducing the burden of heart disease and stroke, including Target: BP,” Rakotz said.

Target: BP™ is a joint initiative between the AHA and AMA aimed at reducing the number of American adults who die each year from heart attack and stroke. The MAP BP improvement program is a central part of the initiative.  

High blood pressure contributes to major health problems, including heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney failure and more. The American Heart Association’s goal is to improve cardiovascular health of all Americans by 20 percent while reducing deaths from cardiovascular disease and stroke by 20 percent by the year.

Co-authors are Brent Egan, M.D.; R. Bruce Hanin, M.D.; Irfan Asif, M.D., Jianing Yang, M.S., Susan Sutherland, Ph.D., Robert Davis; and Gregory Wozniak, Ph.D.

Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

The American Medical Association funded this study.

Note: Scientific presentation time of abstract 93 is 4:30 p.m. PT/ 7:30 p.m. ET, Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017.

Additional Resources:

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Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association and American Stroke Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events.  The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: 214-706-1173

Maggie Francis: 214-706-1382; maggie.francis@heart.org 

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsSat, 16 Sep 2017 22:00:18 GMTStudy Highlights: Primary care practices using the Measure accurately, Act rapidly and Partner with patients (MAP) program drove down hypertension rates among patients. In six months of MAP, hypertension control rose from 65.6 percent to 74.8 percent, among more than 21,000 hypertension patients at U.S. primary care practices. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/blood-pressure-better-controlled-with-map-for-doctorsSat, 16 Sep 2017 22:00:00 GMT
Study Highlight:

  • Overall, home blood pressure monitoring has increased among U.S. adults.
  • However, those with less than a high school diploma and no partner are less likely to monitor blood pressure at home.
  • Adults who have and are being treated for high blood pressure show higher rates of home monitoring.

Embargoed until 11:45a.m. PT/ 2:45p.m. ET, Saturday, Sept. 16

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 16, 2017 – Having a lower education level and no partner is associated with a lower frequency of home blood pressure monitoring, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension 2017 Scientific Sessions.

Researchers assessed the data of 6,113 U.S. adults from the 2013-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

They found:

  • The number of American adults checking blood pressure at home at least monthly has increased about 4 percent (from 21.7 percent in 2009-2010 to 25.5 percent in 2013-2014).
  • Having less than a high school diploma and no partner was associated with a lower frequency of home blood pressure monitoring.
  • Adults who had high blood pressure, were aware of high blood pressure and were being treated for high blood pressure showed higher rates of home monitoring.

The American Heart Association recommends home monitoring for all people with high blood pressure. Home monitoring allows hypertensive individuals to take ownership of their treatment and helps healthcare providers determine whether treatments are working. It also helps to evaluate potential false readings that differ between the doctor’s office and at home.

This recommendation is in concert with the American Heart Association and American Medical Association’s nationwide initiative, Target: BP, which encourages health care providers to reach and sustain a blood pressure control rate of 70 percent or higher among their patients.

Co-authors include Joel C. Marrs, Pharm.D.; Sarah L. Anderson, Pharm.D.

Additional Resources:

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Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: 214-706-1173

Maggie Francis: 214-706-1382; maggie.francis@heart.org 

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsSat, 16 Sep 2017 18:47:43 GMTStudy Highlight: Overall, home blood pressure monitoring has increased among U.S. adults. However, those with less than a high school diploma and no partner are less likely to monitor blood pressure at home. Adults who have and are being treated for high blood pressure show higher rates of home monitoring. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/adults-without-partners-monitor-their-blood-pressure-less-frequentlySat, 16 Sep 2017 18:45:00 GMT
Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsFri, 15 Sep 2017 22:00:09 GMTStudy Highlights: Gender matters when it comes to what’s most likely to elevate blood pressure in young to middle-aged adults. The volume of blood pumped from the left ventricle during heartbeats, i.e., stroke volume, is the main determinant of blood pressure levels in women, while blood pressure in men is more likely to be determined by the amount of resistance in the body’s blood vessels. The results suggest a possible need for gender-specific treatment of high blood pressure in young to middle-aged people. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/high-blood-pressure-reasons-differ-by-gender-in-teens-young-adultsFri, 15 Sep 2017 22:00:00 GMT
Aspectos destacados:

  • Las mujeres que desarrollan preeclampsia temprano en el embarazo son más propensas que las mujeres sin este síndrome a sufrir un engrosamiento del músculo cardíaco izquierdo un mes después del parto.
  • Los cambios del músculo cardíaco fueron más graves entre las mujeres que desarrollaron preeclampsia antes de las 34 semanas de embarazo.
  • En otro estudio, la monitorización de telemedicina parece prometedora para reducir los reingresos hospitalarios de mujeres que desarrollan hipertensión justo después de dar a luz.

Prohibida su publicación hasta las 15:00 PT/18:00 ET del jueves, 14 de septiembre de 2017

SAN FRANCISCO, 14, de septiembre de 2017 – Las mujeres que desarrollan preeclampsia temprano en el embarazo son más propensas a sufrir un engrosamiento del músculo cardíaco izquierdo un mes después del parto. Los cambios fueron más graves entre las mujeres de desarrollaron el síndrome pronto, después de la semana 34 del embarazo, de acuerdo con las investigaciones presentadas hoy en las sesiones científicas en conjunto de 2017 del Council on Hypertension de la American Heart Association (AHA), el Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease de la AHA, la American Society of Hypertension en San Francisco.

La preeclampsia es una peligrosa elevación de la presión arterial que se produce en la segunda mitad del embarazo. Las mujeres con preeclampsia suelen tener una cantidad anormal de proteínas en la orina. De acuerdo con los National Institutes of Health, el número exacto de mujeres que desarrollan preeclampsia no se conoce pero se estima que está entre un 2% y un 8% de todos los embarazos en todo el mundo y alrededor de un 3,4% en Estados Unidos.

La aparición temprana de la preeclampsia, que ocurre antes de la semana 34 de gestación, normalmente es una forma más grave de la enfermedad, declaró el autor del estudio, el Dr. GianLuca Colussi, profesor adjunto de medicina en la Universidad de Udine en Udine, Italia. "Las mujeres con preeclampsia de aparición temprana tienen el mayor riesgo de desarrollar una enfermedad cardiovascular posteriormente."

Colussi y sus compañeros estudiaron la estructura del corazón y su función en 65 mujeres un mes después del parto. Las mujeres no tenían la presión arterial alta antes de quedarse embarazadas pero desarrollaron preeclampsia durante el embarazo. Un treinta y seis por cierto de estas mujeres sufrió una preeclampsia de aparición temprana. Para realizar comparaciones, también incluyeron en el estudio a 16 mujeres no embarazadas con hipertensión, 6 mujeres embarazadas sanas y 30 mujeres no embarazadas sanas.

Esto fue lo que descubrieron:

  • En comparación con las mujeres sanas embarazadas y no embarazadas, las mujeres con preeclampsia presentaban un mayor riesgo de hipertrofia del ventrículo izquierdo. Esto sucede cuando la cavidad de bombeo izquierda del corazón se engrosa, lo que dificulta que el corazón bombee de forma eficiente.

  • Las mujeres con preeclampsia también eran más propensas a sufrir cambios en el ventrículo izquierdo lo que se traduce en una disfunción diastólica, que pone en peligro la capacidad del corazón para relajarse y llenarse de sangre.

  • Las mujeres con preeclampsia de aparición temprana desarrollaron cambios del ventrículo izquierdo más graves, muy similares a los que se suelen observar en pacientes con hipertensión crónica con un alto riesgo de trastornos cardiovasculares.

  • Entre las mujeres con preeclampsia, las que tuvieron la de aparición tardía tenían niveles de presión arterial más altos, una media de 136/91 mm Hg, que aquellas con una aparición temprana, con una media de 125/87 mm Hg. Una posible explicación, según Colussi, puede ser que las pacientes con preeclampsia de aparición temprana se recuperaron antes que las pacientes con preeclampsia de aparición tardía después del parto.

Los hallazgos señalan que las mujeres embarazadas con preeclampsia y sus médicos deben ser conscientes del elevado riesgo cardiovascular que puede ocurrir después del parto.

"Se deben realizar cribados a estas mujeres para detectar factores de riesgo cardiovascular importantes y deben implementarse estrategias de prevención tan pronto como sea posible", afirmó Colussi. "Hemos demostrado que las mujeres preeclampsia de aparición temprana podrían tener un riesgo incluso mayor, por lo que se recomiendan intervenciones preventivas, como el uso de fármacos que actúan en el remodelado del ventrículo izquierdo."

"Se necesitan más investigaciones con más pacientes para validar estos resultados, así como para ayudar a explicar por qué los cambios en el corazón son más propensos a ocurrir", afirmó.

En otro estudio sobre la preeclampsia presentado en la reunión científica (resumen 34), los investigadores evaluaron una intervención de tratamiento y monitorización con telemedicina, para mujeres con presión arterial alta grave después del parto o con riesgo de desarrollarla. Los primeros resultados sugieren que el enfoque es factible, las pacientes lo aceptan y es una estrategia prometedora para reducir los reingresos hospitalarios y las complicaciones relacionadas con la hipertensión posparto.

Coautores con Colussi son la Dra. Cristiana Catena, Ph.D.; Dra. Lorenza Driul; Dra. Francesca Pezzutto; Dra. Valentina Fagotto; y Dr. Leonardo Alberto Sechi. Los conflictos de interés de los autores están en el artículo. La PierSilverio Nassimbeni Foundation ha financiado el estudio del Dr. Colussi.

Los coautores del estudio de telemonitorización son Kara K. Hoppe, Julie B. Zella, Nicole A. Thomas, Heather M. Johnson.

Nota: La hora de presentación para los resúmenes 26 y 34 es 15:20 PT/18:20 ET, jueves, 14 de septiembre de 2017

Recursos adicionales:

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Las declaraciones y conclusiones de los autores de los estudios que se presentan en las reuniones científicas de la American Heart Association y la American Stroke Association pertenecen a los autores del estudio y no reflejan necesariamente la postura ni las políticas de la asociación. La asociación no ofrece garantía de ningún tipo de su exactitud o fiabilidad. La asociación recibe financiación de personas particulares principalmente; también realizan donaciones fundaciones y empresas (incluidas empresas farmacéuticas y fabricantes de dispositivos entre otras) y financian eventos o programas específicos de la asociación. La asociación tiene políticas estrictas para evitar que estas relaciones influyan en el contenido científico. Los ingresos procedentes de empresas famacéuticas y fabricantes de dispositivos así como de proveedores de seguros sanitarios están disponibles en www.heart.org/corporatefunding

Acerca de la American Heart Association

La American Heart Association está comprometida con la prevención de las cardiopatías y los accidentes cerebrovasculares, las dos causas principales de muerte en el mundo. Nuestro equipo está formado por millones de voluntarios para financiar la investigación innovadora, luchar por una política de sanidad pública más fuerte y proporcionar herramientas e información que salvan vidas para evitar y tratar estas enfermedades. La asociación tiene su sede en Dallas y es la organización formada por voluntarios mayor y más antigua del país dedicada a luchar contra las cardiopatías y los accidentes cerebrovasculares. Para obtener más información o implicarse en la causa, llame al 1-800-AHA-USA1, visite heart.org o llame a cualquiera de nuestras oficinas situadas por todo el país. Síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

Para consultas de los medios de comunicación y el punto de vista de la portavoz de la AHA/ASA: 214-706-1173

Maggie Francis: 214-706-1382; maggie.francis@heart.org

Para consultas públicas: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org y strokeassociation.org

]]>Heart NewsForeign Language News ReleasesStroke NewsThu, 14 Sep 2017 22:07:01 GMTAspectos destacados: Las mujeres que desarrollan preeclampsia temprano en el embarazo son más propensas que las mujeres sin este síndrome a sufrir un engrosamiento del músculo cardíaco izquierdo un mes después del parto. Los cambios del músculo cardíaco fueron más graves entre las mujeres que desarrollaron preeclampsia antes de las 34 semanas de embarazo. En otro estudio, la monitorización de telemedicina parece prometedora para reducir los reingresos hospitalarios de mujeres que desarrollan hipertensión justo después de dar a luz. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/es-posible-que-las-mujeres-con-complicaciones-en-el-embarazo-tengan-la-funcion-cardiaca-afectada-despues-del-partoThu, 14 Sep 2017 22:00:00 GMT
Aspectos destacados del estudio:

  • Mantener un peso saludable supone un aspecto clave para prevenir aumentos de la presión arterial desde la juventud hasta la madurez.
  • Estos hallazgos apoyan la necesidad de crear intervenciones que ayuden a las personas a mantener un peso normal durante toda la vida.

Prohibida su publicación hasta las 15:00 PT / 18:00 ET del jueves 14 de septiembre de 2017

SAN FRANCISCO, 14 de septiembre de 2017 – Nuevas investigaciones demuestran que mantener un peso saludable durante toda la vida – incluso más que los otros factores estudiados – es importante para controlar la presión arterial, de acuerdo con las investigaciones presentadas hoy en las sesiones científicas conjuntas de 2017 del Council on Hypertension de la American Heart Association (AHA), el Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease de la AHA, la American Society of Hypertension en San Francisco.

“El aumento de la presión arterial en edades jóvenes está asociado a la aparición temprana de cardiopatías y accidentes cerebrovasculares; las directrices estadounidenses para el tratamiento de la hipertensión alientan que se mantengan hábitos saludables durante toda la vida para limitar los aumentos de la presión arterial”, ha manifestado John N. Booth III, Ph.D., investigador posdoctoral de la Strategically Focused Hypertension Research Network de la American Heart Association en la Universidad de Alabama en Birmingham (EE. UU.). “Estudiamos específicamente el impacto a largo plazo de mantener hábitos saludables sobre los cambios de la presión arterial entre el periodo de juventud y de madurez”.

Los investigadores analizaron el impacto de mantener cinco hábitos saludables sobre los niveles de presión arterial durante 25 años:

  • Un peso saludable, definido como índice de masa corporal inferior a 25 kg/m2.
  • No fumar nunca.
  • De 0 a 7 bebidas alcohólicas a la semana para las mujeres y de 0 a 14 para los hombres.
  • 150 minutos o más de actividad física, de moderada a intensa, a la semana.
  • Mantener una dieta sana, basada en el plan dietético Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (enfoques dietéticos para detener la hipertensión).

Se evaluaron 4.630 participantes del estudio "Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults" (Desarrollo de riesgo en arterias coronarias en jóvenes adultos), que tenían de de 18 a 30 años en 1985 y 1986, cuando comenzó el estudio. Durante el seguimiento de 25 años, los investigadores midieron la presión arterial y los hábitos saludables 8 veces, hasta que los participantes alcanzaron la madurez.

Esto fue lo que descubrieron:

  • Los participantes que mantuvieron un peso saludable tenían más probabilidades de tener presión arterial normal conforme cumplían años. En concreto, aquellos que mantuvieron un peso óptimo tenían un 41% menos de probabilidad de elevar la presión arterial conforme cumplían años.
  • Practicar actividad física o mantener una dieta saludable no estaban asociadas a cambios en la presión arterial durante el periodo de 25 años.
  • No fumar nunca y no consumir alcohol o un consumo moderado se asociaron a un menor aumento en la presión arterial en la madurez, pero se requiere un estudio mayor para verificar esta relación.
  • Los participantes en el estudio que mantuvieron al menos 4 de los hábitos tenían un 27% más de posibilidades de tener presión arterial normal que un aumento de la presión arterial desde la juventud a la madures.

“Estos datos sugieren que el peso es un factor muy importante para mantener una presión arterial normal desde la juventud hasta la madures”, señaló el Dr. Booth. “Estos resultados aportan pruebas de que lo que debemos hacer es centrarnos en cómo crear intervenciones que permitan a las personas mantener un peso normal durante toda la vida. Los demás hábitos estudiados pueden jugar un papel importante, ya que pueden influir en el peso corporal”.

Además, aunque no estaban tan estrechamente relacionados con los cambios en la presión arterial con el tiempo, el Dr. Booth enfatizó que los otros hábitos saludables aportan claros beneficios para la salud cardiovascular general y ayudan a mantener un buen peso. “La American Heart Association recomienda mantener hábitos saludables para evitar factores de riesgo de desarrollo de cardiopatías y accidentes cerebrovasculares, incluida la hipertensión arterial”.

Los coautores son Norrina B. Allen, Ph.D.; April P. Carson, Ph.D.; David Calhoun, M.D.; Daichi Shimbo, M.D.; James M. Shikany, Dr.Ph.; Cora E. Lewis, M.D.; David T. Redden, Ph.D. y Paul Muntner, Ph.D. Los conflictos de interés de los autores están en el artículo.

El National Heart Lung and Blood Institute de los National Institutes of Health y la American Heart Association han financiado este estudio.

Nota: La hora de presentación científica del póster P149 es  las 17:30 PT/ 20:30. ET del jueves 14 de septiembre de 2017.

Recursos adicionales:

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Las declaraciones y conclusiones de los autores de los estudios que se presentan en las reuniones científicas de la American Heart Association y la American Stroke Association pertenecen a los autores del estudio y no reflejan necesariamente la postura ni las políticas de la asociación. La asociación no ofrece garantía de ningún tipo de su exactitud o fiabilidad. La asociación recibe financiación de personas particulares principalmente; también realizan donaciones fundaciones y empresas (incluidas empresas farmacéuticas y fabricantes de dispositivos entre otras) y financian eventos o programas específicos de la asociación. La asociación tiene políticas estrictas para evitar que estas relaciones influyan en el contenido científico. Los ingresos procedentes de empresas famacéuticas y fabricantes de dispositivos así como de proveedores de seguros sanitarios están disponibles en www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

Acerca de la American Heart Association

La American Heart Association está comprometida con la prevención de las cardiopatías y los accidentes cerebrovasculares, las dos causas principales de muerte en el mundo. Nuestro equipo está formado por millones de voluntarios para financiar la investigación innovadora, luchar por una política de sanidad pública más fuerte y proporcionar herramientas e información que salvan vidas para evitar y tratar estas enfermedades. La asociación tiene su sede en Dallas y es la organización formada por voluntarios mayor y más antigua del país dedicada a luchar contra las cardiopatías y los accidentes cerebrovasculares. Para obtener más información o implicarse en la causa, llame al 1-800-AHA-USA1, visite heart.org o llame a cualquiera de nuestras oficinas situadas por todo el país. Síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

Para consultas de los medios de comunicación y el punto de vista de la portavoz de la AHA/ASA: 214-706-1173

Maggie Francis: 214-706-1382; maggie.francis@heart.org.

Para consultas públicas: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org y strokeassociation.org

]]>Heart NewsForeign Language News ReleasesStroke NewsThu, 14 Sep 2017 22:07:43 GMTAspectos destacados del estudio: Mantener un peso saludable supone un aspecto clave para prevenir aumentos de la presión arterial desde la juventud hasta la madurez. Estos hallazgos apoyan la necesidad de crear intervenciones que ayuden a las personas a mantener un peso normal durante toda la vida. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/mantener-un-peso-saludable-ayuda-a-tener-una-baja-presion-arterial-durante-toda-la-vidaThu, 14 Sep 2017 22:00:00 GMT
Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsThu, 14 Sep 2017 22:00:14 GMTHighlights: Women who develop preeclampsia in earlier pregnancy are more likely than women without the condition to have thickening of the left heart muscle one month after delivery. The heart muscle changes were more severe among women who developed preeclampsia before 34 weeks of pregnancy. In another study, telehealth monitoring shows promise to reduce hospital readmissions in women who develop hypertension immediately after having a baby. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/women-with-pregnancy-complication-may-have-impaired-heart-function-after-deliveryThu, 14 Sep 2017 22:00:00 GMT
Heart NewsScientific Conferences & MeetingsStroke NewsThu, 14 Sep 2017 22:00:08 GMTStudy Highlights: Maintaining a healthy weight is a key health behavior to prevent blood pressure increases from young adulthood into middle age. These findings support the need to create interventions that will help people maintain normal body weight throughout their lives. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/maintaining-healthy-weight-helps-keep-blood-pressure-low-through-lifeThu, 14 Sep 2017 22:00:00 GMT
Study Highlights                                                                                                                                        

  • Infections, chronic high blood pressure and bleeding or clotting disorders increase the risk of pregnancy-related stroke in women with preeclampsia.
  • Although pregnancy-related stroke is rare, women with preeclampsia are at higher risk of stroke during pregnancy and postpartum.

Embargoed until 3 p.m. CT / 4 p.m. ET Thursday, May 25, 2017

DALLAS, May 25, 2017 — Urinary tract infections, chronic high blood pressure and bleeding or clotting disorders may increase the risk of pregnancy-associated stroke in women with preeclampsia, a high-blood pressure disorder unique to pregnancy, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

Women with preeclampsia are at higher risk of stroke during pregnancy and after delivery. But while preeclampsia affects 3 percent to 8 percent of all pregnancies, pregnancy-related stroke remain rare.

In a study of women admitted to hospitals in New York State from 2003 through 2012, researchers identified 88,857 women with preeclampsia. Of that number, 197 had pregnancy-associated stroke.

Compared with women who had preeclampsia but did not have a stroke, women who had preeclampsia and pregnancy-associated stroke were:

  • seven times more likely to have severe preeclampsia or eclampsia; and
  • about three times more likely to have infections when they arrive at hospital, or had high blood pressure before developing preeclampsia or had blood disorders involving clots or excessive bleeding.

“Preeclampsia is a very complex disorder that’s not completely understood,” said Eliza Miller, M.D., study lead author and vascular neurology fellow at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. “Our study sought to discover if there are other risk factors or clues that may help identify the women with preeclampsia who are at the highest risk for pregnancy-related stroke. We were looking for risk factors that could be prevented or treated.”

Researchers noted a link with urinary tract infections was interesting “because those infections are not only treatable, but could be preventable,” Miller said. 

Using billing data from the New York State Department of Health inpatient database, researchers compared women aged 12 to 55 years old with preeclampsia and pregnancy-associated stroke to a matched control group of women with preeclampsia who did not have strokes. Among the women with preeclampsia and stroke, most strokes occurred postpartum, after women had been discharged home after delivery. More than one in 10 of the preeclampsia-related strokes were fatal.

The study’s reliance on patients’ billing data limited the level of detail researchers could analyze and restricted them from drawing definitive conclusions. But the associations were strong enough, Miller said, to help generate new ideas and directions for more research.  

“Preeclampsia is a very common disorder, and a lot of people are not aware of its association with stroke,” Miller said. “Women with preeclampsia should take any neurological symptoms, such as severe headache, very seriously, especially during the postpartum period. This needs to be a major focus of future stroke research in women.”

The American Heart Association recommends home blood pressure monitoring for all people with high blood pressure.

Co-authors are Hajere Gatollari, M.P.H.; Gloria Too, M.D.; Amelia Boehme, Ph.D., M.S.P.H.; Lisa Leffert, M.D.; Randolph Marshall, M.D.; Mitchell Elkind, M.D., M.S.; and Joshua Willey, M.D., M.S. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

The National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke funded the study.

Note: May is American Stroke Month and Preeclampsia Awareness Month.

Additional Resources:

###

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke –  the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: (214) 706-1173

Bridgette McNeill: (214) 706-1135; bridgette.mcneill@heart.org  

For Public Inquiries: (800)-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

Life is why, science is how . . . we help people live longer, healthier lives.

]]>Heart NewsStroke NewsThu, 25 May 2017 20:00:06 GMTInfections, chronic high blood pressure and bleeding or clotting disorders increase the risk of pregnancy-related stroke in women with preeclampsia. Although pregnancy-related stroke is rare, women with preeclampsia are at higher risk of stroke during pregnancy and postpartum. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/infections-other-factors-raise-risk-of-pregnancy-related-stroke-in-women-with-preeclampsiaThu, 25 May 2017 20:00:00 GMT
DALLAS, TX September 12, 2017 — The American Heart Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease and stroke, applauds today’s announcement from Dr. Tom Frieden, Vital Strategies, Bloomberg Philanthropies, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in creating Resolve to Save Lives, an initiative leveraging the strengths and resources of these partners to invest in public health strategies to save lives in low- and middle-income countries.

“In our work in more than 70 countries and with thousands of hospitals around the world, we have seen the need for improving the public health infrastructure and surveillance systems to decrease preventable diseases and deaths,” said American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown. “Dr. Frieden’s global leadership is urgently needed and compliments our own efforts to increase control of blood pressure, reduce dietary sodium intake, eliminate trans fats and ensure every nation has the needed systems in place to help their communities build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. The launch of the Resolve initiative has the potential to not just transform public health, but to transform nations. The American Heart Association looks forward to working with this groundbreaking global health initiative as part of our growing worldwide outreach.”

The American Heart Association has valued our longstanding relationship with Dr. Tom Frieden. Our successful collaborations include incentivizing the food and restaurant industries to provide healthier options by reducing sodium and eliminating trans fats, tobacco control and the Million Hearts initiative. This new global project provides additional opportunities to save 100 million lives from heart disease and stroke.

###

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association receives funding mostly from individuals. Foundations and corporations donate as well, and fund specific programs and events. Strict policies are enforced to prevent these relationships from influencing the Association's science content. Financial information for the American Heart Association, including a list of contributions from pharmaceutical companies and device manufacturers, is available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

For Media Inquiries: (214) 706-1173

Suzette.Harris@heart.org, (214) 706-1207

For Public Inquiries: (800) AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

]]>Advisories & CommentsHeart NewsStroke NewsTue, 12 Sep 2017 16:09:37 GMTDALLAS, TX September 12, 2017 — The American Heart Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease and stroke, applauds today’s announcement from Dr. Tom Frieden, Vital Strategies, Bloomberg Philanthropies, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in creating Resolve to Save Lives, an initiative leveraging the strengths and resources of these partners to invest in public health strategies to save lives in low- and middle-income countries.http://newsroom.heart.org/news/global-health-initiative-could-transform-nationsTue, 12 Sep 2017 15:37:00 GMT
Recomendaciones destacadas

  • El conjunto de siete pasos sencillos para mantener la salud del corazón, denominado "Life's Simple 7", también puede ayudar a mantener la salud del cerebro en excelentes condiciones, afirma un grupo de expertos.
  • Mejorar el estado de salud mediante las recomendaciones de "Life's Simple 7" puede ayudar a reducir el riesgo de demencia provocada por accidentes cerebrovasculares, demencia vascular o la enfermedad de Alzheimer.

DALLAS, 7 de septiembre de 2017 — Llevar un estilo de vida saludable es tan beneficioso para el cerebro como lo es para el resto del cuerpo y ayuda a reducir el riesgo de deterioro cognitivo (pérdida en la capacidad para razonar) relacionado con la edad, según se afirma en las nuevas recomendaciones de la American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Tanto el corazón como el cerebro necesitan un flujo sanguíneo adecuado pero muchas personas experimentan un estrechamiento o bloqueo de los vasos sanguíneos en el transcurso de su vida. Esta enfermedad es lo que conocemos como ateroesclerosis y es la causa de muchos ataques cardíacos y accidentes cerebrovasculares. Muchos factores de riesgo de la ateroesclerosis se pueden modificar con una dieta sana, actividad física y evitar el consumo de productos del tabaco, entre otras recomendaciones.

"La investigación resumida en las recomendaciones demuestra de forma convincente que los factores de riesgo que provocan la ateroesclerosis, también son los principales contribuyentes al deterioro cognitivo en la vejez y la enfermedad de Alzheimer. Mediante siete sencillos pasos, denominados "Life's Simple 7", no solo podemos prevenir un ataque cardíaco o un accidente cerebrovascular, sino que también evitamos el deterioro cognitivo”, explica el Dr. Philip Gorelick, especialista en neurología vascular, MPH, director del grupo de redacción de recomendaciones y director médico ejecutivo del Mercy Health Hauenstein Neurosciences de Grand Rapids, Michigan.

"Life's Simple 7" presenta un grupo de factores saludables desarrollados por la American Heart Association para definir y fomentar la salud cardiovascular. Los estudios demuestran que estos siete factores también ayudan a mantener la salud del cerebro de los adultos en buenas condiciones.

El programa "Life's Simple 7" insta a:

  • Controlar la presión arterial
  • Controlar el colesterol
  • Mantener el azúcar en sangre a niveles normales
  • Realizar ejercicio físico
  • Llevar una dieta sana
  • Perder el peso extra
  • No empezar a fumar o dejar de hacerlo

Un cerebro sano se define como un cerebro con capacidad para prestar atención, recibir y reconocer la información a través de los sentidos, aprender y recordar, comunicarse, resolver problemas y tomar decisiones, asistir a la capacidad motora y controlar las emociones. El deterioro cognitivo puede afectar a alguna o a todas estas funciones.

Las recomendaciones, publicadas en la revista de la American Heart Association Stroke, destacan la importancia de seguir estos pasos para mantener la salud cerebral lo antes posible porque la ateroesclerosis, el estrechamiento de las arterias causante de ataques cardíacos, insuficiencia cardíaca y accidentes cerebrovasculares, puede aparecer en la infancia. "Se están llevando a cabo estudios para conocer cómo las estrategias cardiosaludables pueden afectar a la salud del cerebro, incluso en las primeras etapas de la vida", afirma Gorelick. Aunque aún es necesario realizar más investigaciones, "las perspectivas son prometedoras".

El aumento de la presión arterial, el colesterol y el azúcar en sangre pueden provocar alteraciones en vasos sanguíneos grandes y pequeños, lo que da lugar a una sucesión de complicaciones que reducen el flujo sanguíneo al cerebro. Por ejemplo, sabemos que la presión arterial alta, que afecta a 1 de cada 3 adultos en EE. UU., daña vasos sanguíneos que suministran oxígeno y nutrientes al corazón y al cerebro, puntualiza Gorelick. El daño puede desembocar en la acumulación de depósitos grasos o ateroesclerosis, y a la formación de coágulos asociada. Los vasos se estrechan y se reduce el flujo sanguíneo al cerebro, lo que puede provocar un accidente cerebrovascular o accidentes isquémicos transitorios". La disminución de la capacidad mental resultante se denomina deterioro cognitivo vascular o demencia vascular.

Antes, los expertos creían que los problemas cognitivos provocados por la enfermedad de Alzheimer y otras afecciones similares eran totalmente independientes del accidente cerebrovascular pero "con el tiempo, hemos descubierto que los mismos factores de riesgo del accidente cerebrovascular mencionados en "Life's Simple 7" también son factores de riesgo de la enfermedad de Alzheimer y, posiblemente, de otros trastornos neurodegenerativos", explica Gorelick.

En las recomendaciones también se indica que es importante seguir las directrices previamente publicadas por la American Heart Association, el Institute of Medicine y la Alzheimer's Association, donde se incluyen el control del riesgo cardiovascular y se sugiere la implicación social, entre otras estrategias relacionadas, para mantener la salud del cerebro.

Las acciones de "Life's Simple 7", basadas en las conclusiones de diferentes estudios científicos, cumplen tres normas prácticas que el comité desarrolló como indicadores para mejorar la salud del cerebro porque se pueden medir, modificar y monitorizar, afirma Gorelick. Estos tres criterios hacen posible pasar del conocimiento a la acción porque los profesionales sanitarios pueden evaluar fácilmente los elementos de "Life's Simple 7", como la presión arterial, pueden animar a cumplir otros pasos saludables probados y pueden evaluar los cambios con el paso del tiempo.

Las recomendaciones de la AHA proporcionan la base para desarrollar una definición más amplia de salud del cerebro que incluye otros factores influyentes, explica Gorelick, como la presencia de fibrilación auricular, un tipo de irregularidad en el latido cardíaco que se ha asociado a problemas cognitivos, el nivel de educación y alfabetización, la condición económica y social, la región geográfica de residencia, otras enfermedades del cerebro y traumatismos craneoencefálicos.

También representan el punto de partida para ampliar las investigaciones hacia áreas que plantean la existencia de marcadores detectables, como hallazgos en pruebas de imagen del cerebro o genéticas, que podrían indicar la susceptibilidad a enfermedades cardiovasculares o del cerebro, aclara Gorelick. "En algún momento de nuestra vida tiene que haber un interruptor que se activa y nos orienta hacia una dirección futura que nos expondrá al riesgo de padecer deterioro cognitivo y demencia".

El tratamiento de la demencia es muy caro. Se calcula que los gastos de cuidados directos son mayores que los del cáncer e iguales a los de las cardiopatías. Asimismo, el importe de los cuidados sanitarios no remunerados a pacientes con demencia supera los 200 000 millones de dólares al año.

Según las recomendaciones, a medida que la esperanza de vida aumenta en EE. UU. y en otros países, en el año 2030 más de 75 millones de personas de todo el mundo sufrirán demencia. "Los legisladores tendrán que asignar recursos sanitarios a este problema", afirma Gorelick. Los índices de monitorización de la demencia de lugares con iniciativas de salud pública para mejorar la salud del corazón "podrían proporcionar información importante acerca del éxito de este tipo de enfoque y las necesidades futuras de recursos sanitarios para la tercera edad", puntualiza.

Los autores de las recomendaciones revisaron 182 estudios científicos publicados para formular las conclusiones que, junto con "Life's Simple 7", tienen el potencial para ayudar a la gente a mantener el cerebro sano durante toda la vida.

Los coautores son la Dra. Karen L. Furie, M.P.H. (codirectora); Dr. Costantino Iadecola, (codirector); Dr. Eric E. Smith, M.P.H.; Dra. Salina P. Waddy; Dr. Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, Sc.M.; Dr. Hee-Joon Bae, Ph.D.; Dra. Mary Ann Bauman; Dr. Martin Dichgans; Pamela W. Duncan, Ph.D.; Meighan Girgus, M.B.A.; Virginia J. Howard, Ph.D.; Ronald M. Lazar, Ph.D.; Dra. Sudha Seshadri; Dr. Fernando D. Testai, Ph.D., M.S.; Dr. Stephen van Gaal; Dra. Kristine Yaffe; Hank Wasiak, M.B.A.; y Dra. Charlotte Zerna, M.Sc., en nombre de la American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. Los conflictos de interés de los autores están en el artículo.

Recursos adicionales:

###

La American Heart Association/American Stroke Association recibe financiación de personas particulares principalmente. También se reciben donaciones de fundaciones y empresas, y financian programas y eventos específicos. Se aplican políticas estrictas para evitar que estas relaciones influyan en el contenido científico de la asociación. La información de carácter financiero de la American Heart Association, incluida una lista de las contribuciones realizadas por fabricantes farmacéuticos y de dispositivos, así como por proveedores de seguros sanitarios está disponible en www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

Acerca de la American Heart Association

La American Heart Association está comprometida con la prevención de las cardiopatías y los accidentes cerebrovasculares, las dos causas principales de muerte en el mundo. Nuestro equipo está formado por millones de voluntarios para financiar la investigación innovadora, luchar por una política de sanidad pública más fuerte y proporcionar herramientas e información que salvan vidas para evitar y tratar estas enfermedades. La asociación tiene su sede en Dallas y es la organización formada por voluntarios mayor y más antigua del país dedicada a luchar contra las cardiopatías y los accidentes cerebrovasculares. Para obtener más información o implicarse en la causa, llame al 1-800-AHA-USA1, visite heart.org o llame a cualquiera de nuestras oficinas situadas por todo el país. Síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

Para consultas de los medios de comunicación: 214-706-1173

Darcy Spitz: 212-878-5940; Darcy.Spitz@heart.org

Para consultas públicas: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org y strokeassociation.org

]]>Foreign Language News ReleasesStroke NewsMon, 11 Sep 2017 13:46:42 GMTRecomendaciones destacadas: El conjunto de siete pasos sencillos para mantener la salud del corazón, denominado "Life's Simple 7", también puede ayudar a mantener la salud del cerebro en excelentes condiciones, afirma un grupo de expertos. Mejorar el estado de salud mediante las recomendaciones de "Life's Simple 7" puede ayudar a reducir el riesgo de demencia provocada por accidentes cerebrovasculares, demencia vascular o la enfermedad de Alzheimer.http://newsroom.heart.org/news/siete-pasos-para-mantener-la-salud-del-cerebro-desde-la-infancia-hasta-la-tercera-edadThu, 07 Sep 2017 16:00:00 GMT
Advisory Highlights

  • A set of simple steps that promote heart health, called Life’s Simple 7, can also foster ideal brain health, an expert panel says.
  • Improving your health status with Life’s Simple 7 may reduce the risk of dementia caused by strokes, vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

Embargoed until 11 a.m. CT/12 p.m. ET Thursday, September 7, 2017

DALLAS, September 7, 2017 — A healthy lifestyle benefits your brain as much as the rest of your body -- and may lessen the risk of cognitive decline (a loss of the ability to think well) as you age, according to a new advisory from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Both the heart and brain need adequate blood flow, but in many people, blood vessels slowly become narrowed or blocked over the course of their life, a disease process known as atherosclerosis, the cause of many heart attacks and strokes. Many risk factors for atherosclerosis can be modified by following a healthy diet, getting enough physical activity, avoiding tobacco products and other strategies.

“Research summarized in the advisory convincingly demonstrates that the same risk factors that cause atherosclerosis, are also major contributors to late-life cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease. By following seven simple steps — Life's Simple 7 — not only can we prevent heart attack and stroke, we may also be able to prevent cognitive impairment,” said vascular neurologist Philip Gorelick, M.D., M.P.H., the chair of the advisory’s writing group and executive medical director of Mercy Health Hauenstein Neurosciences in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Life’s Simple 7 outlines a set of health factors developed by the American Heart Association to define and promote cardiovascular wellness. Studies show that these seven factors may also help foster ideal brain health in adults.

The Life’s Simple 7 program urges individuals to:

  • Manage blood pressure
  • Control cholesterol
  • Keep blood sugar normal
  • Get physically active
  • Eat a healthy diet
  • Lose extra weight
  • Don’t start smoking or quit

A healthy brain is defined as one that can pay attention, receive and recognize information from our senses; learn and remember; communicate; solve problems and make decisions; support mobility and regulate emotions. Cognitive impairment can affect any or all of those functions.

The advisory, which is published in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke, stresses the importance of taking steps to keep your brain healthy as early as possible, because atherosclerosis -- the narrowing of the arteries that causes many heart attacks, heart failure and strokes -- can begin in childhood. “Studies are ongoing to learn how heart-healthy strategies can impact brain health even early in life,” Gorelick said. Although more research is needed, he said, “the outlook is promising.”

Elevations of blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar can cause impairment of the large and smaller blood vessels, launching a cascade of complications that reduce brain blood flow. For example, high blood pressure — which affects about 1 in 3 U.S. adults — is known to damage blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to the heart and the brain, Gorelick noted. The damage can lead to a buildup of fatty deposits, or atherosclerosis as well as associated clotting. This narrows the vessels, can reduce blood flow to the brain, and can cause stroke or “mini-strokes.” The resulting mental decline is called vascular cognitive impairment, or vascular dementia.

Previously, experts believed problems with thinking caused by Alzheimer’s disease and other, similar conditions were entirely separate from stroke, but “over time we have learned that the same risk factors for stroke that are referred to in Life’s Simple 7 are also risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease and possibly for some of the other neurodegenerative disorders,” Gorelick said.

The advisory also recognizes that it is important to follow previously published guidance from the American Heart Association, Institute of Medicine and Alzheimer's Association, which include controlling cardiovascular risks and suggest social engagement and other related strategies for maintaining brain health.

The action items from Life’s Simple 7, which are based on findings from multiple scientific studies, meet three practical rules the panel developed in pinpointing ways to improve brain health — that they could be measured, modified and monitored, Gorelick said. Those three criteria make it possible to translate knowledge into action because healthcare providers can assess Life’s Simple 7 elements -- like blood pressure -- easily; they can encourage proven, health-promoting steps and they can gauge changes over time.

The AHA advisory provides a foundation on which to build a broader definition of brain health that includes other influential factors, Gorelick said, such as the presence of atrial fibrillation, a type of irregular heartbeat that has been linked to cognitive problems; education and literacy; social and economic status; the geographic region where a person lives; other brain diseases and head injuries.

It is also a starting point for expanding research into areas such as whether there might be detectable markers, like genetic or brain imaging findings, that represent a susceptibiity for cardiovascular or brain illness, Gorelick said. “At some point in our lives, a ‘switch’ may be getting ready to ‘flip,’ or activate, that sets us in a future direction whereby we become at-risk for cognitive impairment and dementia.”

Dementia is costly to treat. Direct care expenses are higher than for cancer and about the same for heart disease, estimates show. Plus, the value of unpaid caregiving for dementia patients may exceed $200 billion a year.

As lives stretch longer in the U.S. and elsewhere, about 75 million people worldwide could have dementia by 2030, according to the advisory. “Policy makers will need to allocate healthcare resources for this,” Gorelick said. Monitoring rates of dementia in places where public health efforts are improving heart health “could provide important information about the success of such an approach and the future need for healthcare resources for the elderly,” he said.

The authors of the advisory reviewed 182 published scientific studies to formulate their conclusions that following Life’s Simple 7 has the potential to help people maintain a healthy brain throughout life.

Co-authors are Karen L. Furie, M.D., M.P.H. (co-chair); Costantino Iadecola, M.D. (co-chair); Eric E. Smith, M.D., M.P.H.; Salina P. Waddy, M.D.; Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, M.D., Sc.M.; Hee-Joon Bae, M.D., Ph.D.; Mary Ann Bauman, M.D.; Martin Dichgans, M.D.; Pamela W. Duncan, Ph.D.; Meighan Girgus, M.B.A.; Virginia J. Howard, Ph.D.; Ronald M. Lazar, Ph.D.; Sudha Seshadri, M.D.; Fernando D. Testai, M.D., Ph.D., M.S.; Stephen van Gaal, M.D.; Kristine Yaffe, M.D.; Hank Wasiak, M.B.A.; and Charlotte Zerna, M.D., M.Sc., on behalf of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

Additional Resources:

###

The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association receives funding mostly from individuals. Foundations and corporations donate as well, and fund specific programs and events. Strict policies are enforced to prevent these relationships from influencing the association’s science content. Financial information for the American Heart Association, including a list of contributions from pharmaceutical and device manufacturers and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries: 214-706-1173

Darcy Spitz: 212-878-5940; Darcy.Spitz@heart.org

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

]]>Stroke NewsThu, 07 Sep 2017 16:00:09 GMTAdvisory Highlights: A set of simple steps that promote heart health, called Life’s Simple 7, can also foster ideal brain health, an expert panel says. Improving your health status with Life’s Simple 7 may reduce the risk of dementia caused by strokes, vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.http://newsroom.heart.org/news/seven-steps-to-keep-your-brain-healthy-from-childhood-to-old-ageThu, 07 Sep 2017 16:00:00 GMT
DALLAS September 9, 2017American Heart Association/American Stroke Association CEO Nancy Brown issued the following comments on slowing progress in the prevention of stroke deaths, according to the latest Vital Signs report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

“Today’s report is distressing, but unfortunately not unexpected based on our previous projections. After more than four decades of decline, progress in preventing stroke deaths has slowed across most states and demographic groups. We’ve especially lost ground in the battle to save lives among Hispanics and those living in the South, despite our ongoing efforts to reduce death and disability from stroke.

Back in 2010, the Association set an aggressive goal to reduce stroke deaths by 20 percent by 2020. This report gives us even more reason to aggressively continue our efforts, especially in multicultural communities and to reach people at younger ages, as we are seeing more strokes in people in their 30s and 40s.

One of the best ways to reduce deaths from stroke is to prevent the stroke from occurring in the first place. We have increased our efforts in helping people and their doctors to control stroke risk factors, including high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol and obesity. The report also showcases the need to continue our programs and advocacy work to treat acute stroke more effectively through improvements in the health system’s response to stroke and increased public knowledge of stroke symptoms and the importance of calling 9-1-1 during a stroke emergency. In addition, we are reaching more hospitals in disadvantaged communities, where stroke is most prevalent, with our stroke systems of care initiative.

Sadly, an estimated 30,000 people have died from stroke -- friends and family members -- that would otherwise still be alive if the progress on stroke mortality had maintained the same downward trajectory.

The heartbreaking part is that while stroke is a leading cause of death in the U.S., it is largely preventable through lifestyle changes, increasingly treatable, and now, more than ever, should be beatable. With the AHA/ASA and its partners putting more strategic efforts in place, together, we can look forward to a day when stroke is no longer a culprit to people losing precious moments in their lives.

###

Media Inquiries: 

Toiya Honore: (214)-706-1456 Toiya.honore@heart.org

Mara Silverio 214-706-1508 mara.silverio@heart.org

For Public Inquiries: (800)-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

]]>Advisories & CommentsStroke NewsWed, 06 Sep 2017 21:46:37 GMTAmerican Heart Association/American Stroke Association CEO Nancy Brown issued the following comments on slowing progress in the prevention of stroke deaths, according to the latest Vital Signs report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).http://newsroom.heart.org/news/american-heart-associationamerican-stroke-association-voices-concern-about-stroke-death-trends-reported-by-centers-for-disease-control-and-preventionWed, 06 Sep 2017 21:45:00 GMT
Study Highlights

  • Restaurant foods and commercially processed foods sold in stores accounted for about 70 percent of dietary sodium intake in a study in three U.S. regions.
  • Salt added at home during food preparation or at the table accounted for a small fraction of dietary sodium.
  • These findings confirm earlier recommendations from the Institute of Medicine to lower dietary sodium by decreasing the amount in commercially processed foods.

Embargoed until 3 p.m. CT / 4 p.m. ET, Monday, May 8, 2017

DALLAS, May 8, 2017 — Restaurant foods and commercially processed foods sold in stores accounted for about 70 percent of dietary sodium intake in a study in three U.S. regions, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Sodium is an important contributor to high blood pressure, one of the leading causes of heart attack and stroke. The American Heart Association recommends a maximum of 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day, which is equivalent to 1 teaspoon of salt. For nearly 70 percent of U.S. adults, the maximum sodium intake recommendation is even lower – 1500 mg/day – based on their age, race or ethnicity, or existing high blood pressure. Sodium can be difficult to avoid, especially when people eat a lot of processed food from grocery stores or restaurants. In fact, the average American adult consumes more than 3,400 mg of sodium per day. To address this serious health threat, in 2010 the Institute of Medicine recommended gradually decreasing sodium levels in commercially processed foods.

Between December 2013 and December 2014, researchers recruited 450 study participants in Palo Alto, California; Birmingham, Alabama; and Minneapolis, Minnesota; divided evenly among each location. Half of participants were female, and equal percentages, overall, were Hispanic, African American, Asian and white. They ranged in age from 18 to 74 years old.

Participants visited the clinic once at the beginning of the study and then kept records of daily food intake for four days, which they reported to researchers in four telephone interviews along with providing samples of salt replicating the amount they had added to food at home.

Across age groups, the level of dietary sodium was similar, with an average 3,501 mg consumed per day —  over 50 percent more than the recommended 2,300 mg.

Researchers found:

  • Sodium added to food outside the home was the leading source (70.9 percent) and sodium found naturally in food was the next highest (14.2 percent);
  • Sodium from salt added in home food preparation (5.6 percent) and added to food at the table (4.9 percent) were next highest.
  • Sodium in home tap water, dietary supplements and antacids contributed minimally (less than 0.5 percent).

“Telling patients to lay off the salt shaker isn’t enough,” said Lisa J. Harnack, Dr.PH., study lead author and professor at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. “Rather, commercially processed and restaurant foods should be the primary focus when educating patients on strategies for lowering sodium in the diet. Food manufacturers and restaurants should be encouraged to lower the sodium content in their food products to support Americans in consuming a diet consistent with sodium intake recommendations.”

“If you’re aiming to limit your sodium intake to the recommended level of less than 2,300 milligrams per day, you’ll need to choose foods wisely when grocery shopping and dining out,” Harnack said. “For packaged foods, the nutrition fact panel may be useful in identifying lower sodium products, and for menu items diners can request sodium content information. Also, if you frequently add salt to food at the table or in home food preparation, consider using less.”

The study was limited in that it did not represent the overall U.S. population because participants were selected based on location and also may have changed their sodium consumption during the study because they knew that it was under watch.

According to the American Heart Association, restaurant and prepackaged food companies must be a part of the solution to reduce sodium and give Americans the healthy options they need and deserve. The American Heart Association encourages packaged food companies and restaurants to reduce the sodium in their products to help make meaningful impact on the health of all Americans. The association has developed a sodium reduction campaign to help.

Co-authors are Mary E. Cogswell, Dr.PH.; James M. Shikany, Ph.D.; Christopher D. Gardner, Ph.D.; Cathleen Gillespie, M.S.; Catherine M. Loria, Ph.D.; Xia Zhou, M.S.; Keming Yuan, M.S.; and Lyn M. Steffen, Ph.D. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention supported the study.

Additional Resources:

###

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke –  the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: (214) 706-1173

Carrie Thacker: (214) 706-1665; carrie.thacker@heart.org

For Public Inquiries: (800)-AHA-USA1 (242-8721); heart.org and strokeassociation.org

Life is why, science is how . . . we help people live longer, healthier lives

 

]]>Heart NewsStroke NewsMon, 08 May 2017 20:00:05 GMTStudy Highlights: Restaurant foods and commercially processed foods sold in stores accounted for about 70 percent of dietary sodium intake in a study in three U.S. regions. Salt added at home during food preparation or at the table accounted for a small fraction of dietary sodium. These findings confirm earlier recommendations from the Institute of Medicine to lower dietary sodium by decreasing the amount in commercially processed foods. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/kicking-the-salt-shaker-habit-may-not-be-enoughMon, 08 May 2017 20:00:00 GMT
Study Highlights

  • Awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure is significantly lower in young adults compared to middle-aged and older adults.
  • Young men lag behind young women in all these areas related to high blood pressure.
  • Researchers urge all adults to check their blood pressure frequently.

Embargoed 3 p.m. CT / 4 p.m. ET Monday, Aug. 28, 2017

DALLAS, Aug. 28, 2017 – Young adults, particularly men, lag behind middle-aged and older adults in awareness and treatment of high blood pressure, putting this population at an increased risk for heart attack and stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

High blood pressure is a leading risk factor for heart attack and stroke and is also a significant public health burden, costing the United States about $110 billion in direct and indirect costs in 2015, according to American Heart Association estimates. American Heart Association guidelines define blood pressure as normal at less than 120/80 and high blood pressure as 140/90 or above.

“While hypertension awareness, treatment and control have improved overall since the early 2000s, all three remain worse in young adults – those aged 18-39,” said senior study author Andrew Moran, M.D., M.P.H., an assistant professor at Columbia University Medical Center in New York.

The study, based on 1999-2014 data taken from more than 41,000 people who participated in eight national health surveys, examined the prevalence and management of high blood pressure among adults.

Among the researchers’ key findings:

  • Only half of the 6.7 million young adults with high blood pressure in 2013-2014 received treatment and only 40 percent got their blood pressure under control.
  • Among young men, rates of awareness, treatment and control were lower compared to young women (68.4 percent versus 86 percent for awareness; 43.7 percent versus 61.3 percent for treatment; and 33.7 percent vs. 51.8 percent for control).
  • Nearly three-quarters of young adults who had high blood pressure were obese compared with 57 percent of middle-aged adults and 42 percent of older adults, suggesting that young adults with high blood pressure are more than twice as likely to be obese.

Researchers noted young women are more likely to have their blood pressure checked due to more frequent healthcare visits like gynecological exams or prenatal care.

The prevalence of prehypertension (readings from 120-139/80-89), was significantly higher among young men (33.6 percent) than young women (12.8 percent). According to the American Heart Association, people with pre-hypertension are likely to develop high blood pressure unless steps are taken to control it.

“Our study identified shortfalls in high blood pressure screening and management among young adults and especially young adult males,” said lead study author Yiyi Zhang, Ph.D., associate research scientist at Columbia University Medical Center in New York. “The first step for young adults is to have their blood pressure measured, whether in a doctor’s office, pharmacy or other place in their community. Young adults with consistently high blood pressure need a link to clinical care to verify the diagnosis and receive regular monitoring and possibly treatment.”

This study emphasizes the need to focus on early hypertension prevention and management in young adults. It also highlights the importance of addressing policy issues related to healthcare access and utilization.

Recognizing the need and importance of blood pressure control, in 2015 the American Heart Association and the American Medical Association began collaborating to get more people appropriately treated to control. Target:BP is a recognition program that urges medical practices, hospitals and health service organizations to reach and sustain a blood pressure control rate of 70 percent or higher among the high blood pressure patients they serve.

Author disclosures are on the manuscript. The National Institutes of Health funded the study.

Additional Resources:

###

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: 214-706-1173

Bridgette McNeill: 214-706-1135; bridgette.mcneill@heart.org

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

 

 

]]>Heart NewsStroke NewsMon, 28 Aug 2017 20:00:10 GMTStudy Highlights: Awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure is significantly lower in young adults compared to middle-aged and older adults. Young men lag behind young women in all these areas related to high blood pressure. Researchers urge all adults to check their blood pressure frequently. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/young-adults-especially-men-fall-behind-in-high-blood-pressure-treatment-and-controlMon, 28 Aug 2017 20:00:00 GMT
Dallas, May 5, 2017 –  Country Music Legend Loretta Lynn, age 85, is expected to make a full recovery after suffering a stroke Thursday night at her home near Nashville, according to news reports tonight. The reports say she was rushed to a Nashville hospital for treatment and her doctors say she is responsive and recuperating.  

 Stroke is the No. 5 cause of death and a leading cause of long term disability in the United States, but what many people may not know is stroke is largely treatable and the faster you are treated, the more likely you are to recover.  

Studies show ischemic stroke patients who receive the clot-busting drug alteplase (IV r-tPA) within 90 minutes of symptom onset are almost 3 times more likely to recover with little or no disability. And 91 percent of stroke patients who were treated with a stent retriever within 2.5 hours of symptom onset recovered with little or no disability.

The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association wants everyone to know the warning signs of stroke. 

Remember F.A.S.T. Face drooping, Arm weakness, Speech difficulty, Time to call 9-1-1.

To learn more about lowering your risk for stroke, visit www.strokeassociation.org, May is American Stroke Month.

About the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association

The American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association are devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based American Heart Association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. The American Stroke Association is a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

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Media Contact: Julie Del Barto, julie.delbarto@heart.org  

]]>Advisories & CommentsStroke NewsSat, 06 May 2017 03:18:28 GMTDallas, May 5, 2017 –  Country Music Legend Loretta Lynn, age 85, is expected to make a full recovery after suffering a stroke Thursday night at her home near Nashville, according to news reports tonight. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/american-heart-associationamerican-stroke-association-joins-fans-sending-country-music-legend-loretta-lynn-wishes-for-a-speedy-recovery-after-suffering-a-strokeSat, 06 May 2017 02:05:00 GMT
Study Highlights

  • A Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health.
  • While most of those at highest risk for a heart attack were more likely to agree on needed health improvements, more than half of those perceiving this need identified barriers to making changes.
  • Older and white participants were more likely than younger and minority group members to express a desire to improve their health.

Embargoed until 3 p.m. CT / 4 p.m. ET Wednesday, May 3, 2017

DALLAS, May 3, 2017 — Nearly one in five people who reported the greatest number of cardiac risk factors did not believe they needed to improve their health, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While most people in the study at the highest risk for a heart attack were more likely to agree on needed health improvements, more than half of those perceiving this need identified barriers to change, which were most commonly lack of self-discipline, work schedule and family responsibilities.

“Understanding what motivates changes in behavior is key to improving the health of individuals and communities,” said F. Daniel Ramirez, M.D, lead study author and a research fellow at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. “Our study sheds light on how knowledge of personally modifiable risk factors for heart attack, such as quitting smoking and exercising, affects people’s perception of the need to improve their health.”

Researchers analyzed 45,443 responses from adults participating in the 2011-12 Canadian Community Health Survey. The survey gathered information about eight established risk factors for heart attack that people can change, including smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, stress, excessive alcohol consumption, lack of physical activity and poor diet. Along with high cholesterol, which was not included in the survey, researchers noted these factors account for 90 percent of heart attack risk. The survey also asked participants if they thought “there is anything you should do to improve your physical health?”

Researchers found:

  • 73.6 percent reported there was something they should do to improve their health.
  • 90.7 percent of those identifying a specific change indicated they wanted to quit/reduce smoking, exercise more, lose weight or eat better.
  • 81.1 percent desiring a change said they intended to improve their health in the coming year.
  • 17.7 percent at greatest risk (5 or more risk factors) did not feel a need to improve their health.

Respondents who reported that they had high blood pressure or diabetes also weren’t more likely to perceive the need to improve their health than those without those conditions. The survey did not include information about whether this group took medications to control these health problems, which may have affected their perceptions about the need to improve their health.

Still, “lifestyle modifications are very important for these conditions, particularly diabetes, even for those on medications,” said Benjamin Hibbert, M.D., Ph.D. senior study author and an interventional cardiologist and assistant professor at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute. 

The study also looked at factors that might bias results, including age, education, income and whether respondents had a regular healthcare provider. After adjusting for these factors, researchers found that older and white participants were more likely than younger and minority group members to express a desire to improve their health.

Hibbert said the study’s take-home message is that recognizing the risk factors for heart attack is effective for motivating some, but not all people to improve their physical health. Effectively convincing people to adopt and sustain healthy lifestyle changes requires a better understanding of what makes them tick, he said.

Despite many similarities between Canada and the United States, researchers said they couldn’t say whether differences in healthcare systems and culture would limit generalizing study findings to the United States.

Co-authors are Yue Chen, Ph.D.; Pietro Di Santo, M.D.; Trevor Simard, M.D.; and Pouya Motazedian, B.Sc. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

###

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: (214) 706-1173

Darcy Spitz : (212) 878-5940; darcy.spitz@heart.org

For Public Inquiries: (800)-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

Life is why, science is how . . . we help people live longer, healthier lives.

]]>Heart NewsStroke NewsWed, 03 May 2017 20:00:12 GMTStudy Highlights: A Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health. While most of those at highest risk for a heart attack were more likely to agree on needed health improvements, more than half of those perceiving this need identified barriers to making changes. Older and white participants were more likely than younger and minority group members to express a desire to improve their health. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/nearly-1-in-5-with-highest-cardiac-risk-dont-think-they-need-to-improve-healthWed, 03 May 2017 20:00:00 GMT
Study Highlights

  • Low-income patients with high blood pressure whose healthcare providers did not use collaborative communication styles or ask about social issues, such as employment and housing, were less likely to take their blood pressure medications as directed.
  • Low-income black patients were least likely to take their medication when social issues weren’t discussed.

Embargoed until 3 p.m. CT / 4 p.m. ET Tuesday, August 22, 2017

DALLAS, August 22, 2017 — The key to getting low-income patients to take their blood pressure medications as prescribed may be as simple as a conversation. Low-income patients with high blood pressure were less likely to take their medications as directed when their healthcare providers did not use a collaborative communication style or ask them about social issues such as employment, housing and partner relationships, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Quality and Outcomes.

Patients not taking high blood pressure medication as directed plays a major role in the continued problem of poorly controlled high blood pressure, a significant risk factor for heart attacks and strokes. Researchers found that patients were three times less likely to take their high blood pressure medications when their providers did not possess a collaborative communication style such as asking open-ended questions and checking their understanding of instructions. Patients were also six times less likely to take their medications as prescribed when a healthcare provider did not ask them about social issues such as employment, housing and partner relationships.

“When healthcare providers ask patients about life challenges or take the time to check their patient’s understanding of instructions, it signals that their healthcare provider genuinely cares about them and provides the motivation and confidence to manage their health issues on their own,” said Antoinette Schoenthaler, Ed.D., lead author for the study and an associate professor of medicine at NYU School of Medicine in New York City.

The researchers audiotaped interactions between 92 patients and 27 providers over a three-month period from three practices that serve a multi-ethnic, low-income population in New York City. One office visit for each patient was audiotaped.

The majority of the patients were black, unemployed and reported some college education. Fifty-eight percent of patients were women and most were seeing the same provider for at least one year. The providers (56 percent white; 67 percent women) have been in practice for an average of 5.8 years. The researchers measured whether patients took their medications during the three-month study period through the use of an electronic monitoring device that recorded the time and date each time they opened the pill bottle.

The researchers found striking differences in medication adherence between the black and white patients. Overall, black patients were more likely to have poor adherence to their blood pressure medications compared to white patients. Moreover, compared to the overall patient population, non-adherence was more pronounced with black patients when social issues were not discussed (eight times less likely to take medication as prescribed compared to six).

“Healthcare providers should talk to patients about the things that get in the way of taking their medication, such as relationship status, employment and housing. Unemployment, for example, affects whether patients can afford medication, which is a primary risk factor for non-adherence. If these issues go undiscussed, healthcare providers may never figure out why patients are not taking their medications,” said Schoenthaler.

She suggested healthcare providers work with community health workers, nurses or medical assistants, to help identify resources for patients who have difficulty taking their medications.

Co-authors are George J. Knafl, Ph.D., Kevin Fiscella, M.D. and Gbenga Ogedegbe, M.D.Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute funded the study.

Additional Resources:

###

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: (214) 706-1173

Darcy Spitz; (212) 878-5940; darcy.spitz@heart.org

For Public Inquiries: (800)-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

]]>Heart NewsStroke NewsTue, 22 Aug 2017 20:00:08 GMTStudy Highlights: Low-income patients with high blood pressure whose healthcare providers did not use collaborative communication styles or ask about social issues, such as employment and housing, were less likely to take their blood pressure medications as directed. Low-income black patients were least likely to take their medication when social issues weren’t discussed. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/low-income-patients-more-likely-to-take-blood-pressure-medication-when-doctor-involves-them-in-conversationTue, 22 Aug 2017 20:00:00 GMT
Study Highlights

  • People who have better cardiovascular health in middle age live longer and spend fewer of their later years with chronic illnesses of all types.
  • They also save money on healthcare costs.

Embargoed until 3 p.m. CT / 4 p.m. ET, Monday, May 1, 2017

DALLAS, May 1, 2017 — People with no major heart disease risk factors in middle age live longer and stay healthy far longer than others, according to a 40-year study reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Good cardiovascular health in middle age delays the onset of many types of disease so that people live longer and spend a much smaller proportion of their lives with chronic illness,” said Norrina Allen, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

In the first study to analyze the impact of cardiovascular health in middle age on the duration of illness later in life, researchers examined data from the Chicago Health Association study, which did initial health assessments in the late 1960s/early 1970s and has followed participants on an ongoing basis using Medicare health records. Researchers determined how many participants had favorable factors: non-smokers, free of diabetes and normal weight, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels; versus those with elevated risk factors or high risk factors.

Comparing those who had two or more high-risk factors in middle age among the 17,939 participants who reached age 65 without a chronic illness, researchers found that those with all favorable factors:

  • lived an average of 3.9 years longer;
  • survived 4.5 years longer before developing a chronic illness;
  • spent 22 percent fewer of their senior years with a chronic illness (39 percent vs. 50 percent); and
  • saved almost $18,000 in Medicare costs.

“Health professionals need to let young adults know that maintaining or adopting a heart-healthy lifestyle makes it more likely that you’ll live longer and still be healthy enough to do the things you love to do when you’re older,” Allen said.

Looking solely at heart disease in 18,714 participants who reached age 65 without having a heart attack, stroke or congestive heart failure, those with all favorable risk factors:

  • lived 6.9 years longer without heart disease; and
  • spent 46.5 percent fewer of their senior years with heart disease.

Allen noted that at the start of the study, when their average age was 44, only 5.6 percent of participants had all favorable factors.

That data is even more grim than a 2011-2012 national survey suggesting only 8.9 percent of U.S. adults age 40-59 had five or more “ideal” health factors, according to The American Heart Association’s Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics - 2017 Update.

“We need to think about cardiovascular health at all stages of life,” she said. “The small proportion of participants with favorable levels in their 40s is a call for all of us to maintain or adopt healthy lifestyles earlier in life. But risk factors and their effects accumulate over time, so even if you have risks it’s never too late to reduce their impact on your later health by exercising, eating right, and treating your high blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes.”

The American Heart Association created My Life Check ® to educate the public on improving health by aiming to achieve seven health measures called Life’s Simple 7. It’s a composite measure of seven modifiable heart-healthy factors: cigarette smoking, physical activity, diet, body mass index, blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose levels.

The study recruited people from Chicago worksites in 1967-1972 and lacks information on how chronic illnesses affected the quality of life of participants. 

Co-authors are Lihui Zhao, Ph.D.; Lei Liu, Ph.D.; Martha Daviglus, M.D., Ph.D.; Kiang Liu, Ph.D.; James Fries, M.D.; Tina Shih, Ph.D.; Daniel Garside, M.S.; Thanh Huyen Vu, M.D.; Jeremiah Stamler, M.D.; and Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, M.D., Sc.M. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute funded the study.

Additional Resources:

###

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Spokesperson Perspective: (214) 706-1173

Bridgette McNeill: (214) 706-1135; bridgette.mcneill@heart.org  

For Public Inquiries: (800)-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

Life is why, science is how . . . we help people live longer, healthier lives

]]>Heart NewsStroke NewsWed, 03 May 2017 16:42:40 GMTPeople who have better cardiovascular health in middle age live longer and spend fewer of their later years with chronic illnesses of all types. They also save money on healthcare costs. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/golden-years-are-longer-and-healthier-for-those-with-good-heart-health-in-middle-ageMon, 01 May 2017 20:00:00 GMT

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The American Heart Association strongly promotes knowledge and proficiency in BLS, ACLS, and PALS and has developed instructional materials for this purpose. Use of these materials in an educational course does not represent course sponsorship by the American Heart Association. Any fees charged for such a course, except a portion of fees needed for AHA course materials, do not represent income to the Association.

 

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